IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The administrative costs of payment by results

  • Giorgio Marini


    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York)

  • Andrew Street


    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York)

This report was commissioned by the Department of Health to look into more detail into the administrative costs of Payment by Results (PbR). Costs were estimated to have increased by around £100k-£180k in hospital trusts and from £90k to £190k in Primary Care Trusts. Most of the additional expenditure is due to recruitment of additional staff.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
File Function: First version, 2006
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Centre for Health Economics, University of York in its series Working Papers with number 017cherp.

in new window

Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:chy:respap:17cherp
Contact details of provider: Postal: York Y010 5DD
Phone: (01904) 321401
Fax: (0)1904 323759
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Diane Dawson & Hugh Gravelle & Mary O'Mahony & Andrew Street & Martin Weale & Adriana Castelli & Rowena Jacobs & Paul Kind & Pete Loveridge & Stephen Martin & Philip Stevens & Lucy Stokes, 2005. "Developing new approaches to measuring NHS outputs and productivity," Working Papers 006cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York, revised Dec 2005.
  2. Diane Dawson & Maria Goddard, 1999. "Long-term contracts in the NHS: a solution in search of a problem?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(8), pages 709-720.
  3. Williamson, Oliver E, 1973. "Markets and Hierarchies: Some Elementary Considerations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(2), pages 316-25, May.
  4. Russell Mannion & Andrew Street, 2006. "Payment by results and demand management: learning from the South Yorkshire laboratory," Working Papers 014cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  5. A. Street & D. Dawson, 2002. "Costing hospital activity: the experience with healthcare resource groups in England," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 3-9, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:chy:respap:17cherp. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Frances Sharp)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.