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Artificial Intelligence and High-Skilled Work: Evidence from Analysts

Author

Listed:
  • Jillian Grennan

    (Duke University - Fuqua School of Business; Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative)

  • Roni Michaely

    (University of Geneva - Geneva Finance Research Institute (GFRI); Swiss Finance Institute)

Abstract

Policymakers fear artificial intelligence (AI) will disrupt labor markets, especially for high-skilled workers. We investigate this concern using novel, task-specific data for security analysts. Exploiting variation in AI's power across stocks, we show analysts with portfolios that are more exposed to AI are more likely to reallocate efforts to soft skills, shift coverage towards low AI stocks, and even leave the profession. Analyst departures disproportionately occur among highly accurate analysts, leaving for non-research jobs. Reallocating efforts toward tasks that rely on social skills improve consensus forecasts. However, increased exposure to AI reduces the novelty in analysts' research which reduces compensation.

Suggested Citation

  • Jillian Grennan & Roni Michaely, 2020. "Artificial Intelligence and High-Skilled Work: Evidence from Analysts," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 20-84, Swiss Finance Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:chf:rpseri:rp2084
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    artificial intelligence; big data; technology; automation; sell-side analysts; job displacement; labor and finance; social skills; non-cognitive skills; tasks; skill premium; skill-biased technological change; compensation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G17 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Financial Forecasting and Simulation
    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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