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How Does Climate Change Affect the Transition of Power Systems: The Case of Germany

Author

Listed:
  • Alexander Golub
  • Kristina Govorukha
  • Philip Mayer
  • Dirk Rübbelke

Abstract

The effects of extreme weather events, such as heat waves and droughts, are taken into account in both global and European policies. Accordingly, the protection of critical infrastructures and in particular, the resilience of the energy sector was the subject of intense research. There are regional differences in the degree to which extreme events affect the energy sector. In Northern Europe, their intensity has increased dramatically within a decade. In our analysis, we identify emerging risks of extreme weather events, in particular, droughts and high temperatures, for the German power sector. Our analysis is based on extensive datasets comprising temperature and drought data for the last 40 years. We find evidence of a higher frequency of power plants outages as a consequence of droughts and high temperatures. We investigate increases in the wholesale electricity price and price volatility and develop a capacity-adjusted drought index. The results are used to assess the monetary loss of power plant outages due to heat waves and droughts. We stress that increasing frequencies of such extreme weather events will aggravate the observed problem, especially with respect to the transition of the power sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Golub & Kristina Govorukha & Philip Mayer & Dirk Rübbelke, 2020. "How Does Climate Change Affect the Transition of Power Systems: The Case of Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 8613, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_8613
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    File URL: https://www.cesifo.org/DocDL/cesifo1_wp8613.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hagspiel, Simeon & Knaut, Andreas & Peter, Jakob, 2017. "Reliability in Multy-Regional Power Systems - Capacity Adequacy and the Role of Interconnectors," EWI Working Papers 2017-7, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln (EWI), revised 29 Jun 2018.
    2. Altvater, Susanne & de Block, Debora & Bouwma, Irene & Dworak, Thomas & Frelih-Larsen, Ana & Görlach, Benjamin & Hermeling, Claudia & Klostermann, Judith & König, Martin & Leitner, Markus & Marinova, , 2012. "Adaptation measures in the EU: Policies, costs, and economic assessment. "Climate Proofing" of key EU policies," ZEW Expertises, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research, number 110558.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    electricity; utilities; thermal generation; climate change; droughts; weather extremes;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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