IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Globalization, Cross-Border Pollution and Welfare


  • Panos Hatzipanayotou
  • Sajal Lahiri
  • Michael S. Michael


We construct a two-good general equilibrium model of international trade for two small open economies where pollution from production is transmitted across borders. Governments in both countries impose emission taxes non-cooperatively. Within this framework, we examine the effect of trade liberalization and of changes in the perception of cross-border pollution on Nash emission taxes, emission levels, and welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Panos Hatzipanayotou & Sajal Lahiri & Michael S. Michael, 2005. "Globalization, Cross-Border Pollution and Welfare," CESifo Working Paper Series 1479, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_1479

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Amitrajeet A. Batabyal, 2011. "The Economics of Hate," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 69(4), pages 534-537, December.
    2. Panos Hatzipanayotou & Sajal Lahiri & Michael S. Michael, 2002. "Can cross-border pollution reduce pollution?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 805-818, November.
    3. John Beghin & David Roland-Holst & Dominique van der Mensbrugghe, 1997. "Trade and Pollution Linkages: Piecemeal Reform and Optimal Intervention," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(2), pages 442-455, May.
    4. Rodney D. Ludema & Ian Wooton, 1994. "Cross-Border Externalities and Trade Liberalization: The Strategic Control of Pollution," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(4), pages 950-966, November.
    5. Copeland Brian R., 1994. "International Trade and the Environment: Policy Reform in a Polluted Small Open Economy," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 44-65, January.
    6. Panos Hatzipanayotou & Sajal Lahiri & Michael S. Michael, 2005. "Reforms of Environmental Policies in the Presence of Cross-border Pollution and Public-Private Clean-up," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(2), pages 315-333, June.
    7. Wilson, John Douglas, 1991. "Optimal Public Good Provision with Limited Lump-Sum Taxation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 153-166, March.
    8. Rauscher, Michael, 1994. "On Ecological Dumping," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 822-840, Supplemen.
    9. James R. Markusen, 1975. "Cooperative Control of International Pollution and Common Property Resources," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 89(4), pages 618-632.
    10. Arja H. Turunen-Red & Alan D. Woodland, 2004. "Multilateral Reforms of Trade and Environmental Policy," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(3), pages 321-336, August.
    11. Lahiri, Sajal & Raimondos-Moller, Pascalis, 1998. "Public good provision and the welfare effects of indirect tax harmonisation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 253-267, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Gonzalez Eiras & Dirk Niepelt, 2004. "Sustaining Social Security," Working Papers 72, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Jun 2004.
    2. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2012. "Stable climate coalitions (Nash) and international trade," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 155-12, Universität Siegen, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht.

    More about this item


    cross-border pollution; emission taxes; terms of trade; globalization; welfare;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_1479. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Klaus Wohlrabe). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.