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Fare-Free Public Transit at Universities: An Evaluation

Author

Listed:
  • Brown, Jeffrey
  • Hess, Daniel Baldwin
  • Shoup, Donald

Abstract

Universities and public transit agencies in the United States have together invented an arrangement – called Unlimited Access – that provides fare-free transit service for all students (and, on some campuses, faculty and staff as well). Unlimited Access is not free transit but is instead a new way to pay for it. The university pays the transit agency for all rides taken by eligible members of the campus community. This article evaluates the results of the Unlimited Access program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Bus ridership for commuting to campus increased by 56 percent during BruinGO’s first year, and solo driving fell by 20 percent. Because these startling results were achieved in a city famous for its addiction to cars, they suggest that Unlimited Access can succeed almost anywhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Brown, Jeffrey & Hess, Daniel Baldwin & Shoup, Donald, 2003. "Fare-Free Public Transit at Universities: An Evaluation," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3rt6d1hz, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt3rt6d1hz
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Philippe Barla & Nathanaël Lapierre & Ricardo Alvarez Daziano & Markus Herrmann, 2012. "Reducing Automobile Dependency on Campus: Evaluating the Impact TDM Using Stated Preferences," Cahiers de recherche CREATE 2012-3, CREATE.
    2. Voss, Achim, 2015. "Collective public-transport tickets and anticipated majority choice: A model of student tickets," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 263-276.
    3. Rotaris, Lucia & Danielis, Romeo, 2015. "Commuting to college: The effectiveness and social efficiency of transportation demand management policies," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 158-168.
    4. Zhou, Jiangping & Wang, Yin & Schweitzer, Lisa, 2012. "Jobs/housing balance and employer-based travel demand management program returns to scale: Evidence from Los Angeles," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 22-35.
    5. Thomas Kolawole OJO & Regina AMOAKO-SAKYI & William AGYEMAN, 2015. "Students’ Satisfaction Of Campus Shuttling Bus Services: A Qualbus Approach," Management Research and Practice, Research Centre in Public Administration and Public Services, Bucharest, Romania, vol. 7(1), pages 68-79, March.

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