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Access to water in a Nairobi slum: women's work and institutional learning

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Listed:
  • Crow, Ben
  • Odaba, Edmond

Abstract

This paper describes the ways that households, and particularly women, experience water scarcity in a large informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya, through heavy expenditures of time and money, considerable investments in water storage and routinized sequences of defer red household tasks. It then delineates three phases of adaptive water and social engineering undertaken in several informal settlements by the Nairobi Water Company in an ongoing attempt to construct effective municipal institutions and infrastructure to improve residential access to water and loosen the grip that informal vendors may have on the market for water in these localities.Â

Suggested Citation

  • Crow, Ben & Odaba, Edmond, 2010. "Access to water in a Nairobi slum: women's work and institutional learning," Center for Global, International and Regional Studies, Working Paper Series qt4xh4c7q4, Center for Global, International and Regional Studies, UC Santa Cruz.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:glinre:qt4xh4c7q4
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard Franceys & Almud Weitz, 2003. "Public-private community partnerships in infrastructure for the poor," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(8), pages 1083-1098.
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