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The Other Side of the Trading Story: Evidence from NYSE

Author

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  • Wong, Woon K

    () (Cardiff Business School)

  • Copeland, Laurence

    () (Cardiff Business School)

  • Lu, Ralph

Abstract

We analyse the well-known TORQ dataset of trades on the NYSE over a 3-month period, breaking down transactions depending on whether the active or passive side was institutional or private. This allows us to compare the returns on the different trade categories. We find that, however we analyse the results, institutions are best informed, and earn highest returns when trading with individuals as counter party. We also confirm the conclusions found elsewhere in the literature that informed traders often place limit orders, especially towards the end of the day (as predicted on the basis of laboratory experiments in Bloomfield, O.Hara, and Saar (2005)). Finally, we find that trading between institutions accounts for the bulk of trading volume, but carries little information and seems to be largely liquidity-driven.

Suggested Citation

  • Wong, Woon K & Copeland, Laurence & Lu, Ralph, 2008. "The Other Side of the Trading Story: Evidence from NYSE," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2008/12, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdf:wpaper:2008/12
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1991. " Measuring the Information Content of Stock Trades," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 179-207, March.
    2. Grossman, Sanford J & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1980. "On the Impossibility of Informationally Efficient Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 393-408, June.
    3. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1991. "The Summary Informativeness of Stock Trades: An Econometric Analysis," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 4(3), pages 571-595.
    4. David Easley & Maureen O'hara, 2004. "Information and the Cost of Capital," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(4), pages 1553-1583, August.
    5. Lee, Yi-Tsung & Lin, Ji-Chai & Liu, Yu-Jane, 1999. "Trading patterns of big versus small players in an emerging market: An empirical analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 701-725, May.
    6. Lee, Charles M C & Ready, Mark J, 1991. " Inferring Trade Direction from Intraday Data," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(2), pages 733-746, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    liquidity trade; informed trades;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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