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How can asset accumulation strategies be meaningful for adivasis in Southern India?

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  • Shoba Arun
  • Samuel Annim
  • Thankom Arun

Abstract

This paper is motivated by the observation that type and combination of assets play a significant role in reducing incidences of shocks by asset-poor households. Asset-based strategies treat assets not just as resources, but also as an agency to transform such resources to improve livelihood choices and tackle risks and shocks. Focusing on the case of adivasi households in the South Indian state of Kerala, we find that the type, number and combinations of specific assets (primarily social and physical capital) yield varied magnitudes of household resilience to both idiosyncratic and covariate shocks. Thus, social policies for specific social groups need to focus on the nature of asset and their combination, rather than welfare-based considerations.

Suggested Citation

  • Shoba Arun & Samuel Annim & Thankom Arun, 2010. "How can asset accumulation strategies be meaningful for adivasis in Southern India?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 11210, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:11210
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    File URL: http://hummedia.manchester.ac.uk/institutes/gdi/publications/workingpapers/bwpi/bwpi-wp-11210.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Grootaert, Christiaan & Narayan, Deepa, 2004. "Local Institutions, Poverty and Household Welfare in Bolivia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1179-1198, July.
    2. Hulme, David, 2003. "Chronic Poverty and Development Policy: An Introduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 399-402, March.
    3. Adato, Michelle & Carter, Michael R. & May, Julian, 2004. "Sense in Sociability? Social Exclusion and Persistent Poverty in South Africa," Staff Paper Series 477, University of Wisconsin, Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    4. Nikolay Nenovsky & S. Statev, 2006. "Introduction," Post-Print halshs-00260898, HAL.
    5. M. Ruth & K. Donaghy & P. Kirshen, 2006. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Regional Climate Change and Variability, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Cattell, Vicky, 2001. "Poor people, poor places, and poor health: the mediating role of social networks and social capital," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 52(10), pages 1501-1516, May.
    7. Shoba Arun, 2008. "Managing Assets and Vulnerability Contexts: Vistas of Gendered Livelihoods of Adivasi Women in South India," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 3208, GDI, The University of Manchester.
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