IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bre/wpaper/811.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

When and how to support renewables? Letting the data speak

Author

Listed:
  • Georg Zachmann
  • Amma Serwaah
  • Michele Peruzzi

Abstract

See also blog post 'Does Europe need a renewables target?'Low-carbon energy technologies are pivotal for decarbonising our economies up to 2050 while ensuring secure and affordable energy. Consequently, innovation that reduces the cost of low-carbon energy would play an important role in reducing transition costs. We assess the two most prominent innovation policy instruments (i) public research, development and demonstration (RD&D) subsidies and (ii) public deployment policies.Our results indicate that both deployment and RD&D coincide with increasing knowledge generation and the improved competitiveness of renewable energy technologies. We find that both support schemes together have a greater effect that they would individually, that RD&D support is unsurprisingly more effective in driving patents and that timing matters. Current wind deployment based on past wind RD&D spending coincides best with wind patenting. If we look into competitiveness we find a similar picture, with the greatest effect coming from deployment.Finally, we find significant cross-border effects, especially for winddeployment. Increased deployment in one country coincides with increased patenting in nearby countries.Based on our findings we argue that both deployment and RD&D support are needed to create innovation in renewable energy technologies. However, we worry that current support is unbalanced. Public spending on deployment has been two orders of magnitude larger (in 2010 about €48 billion in the five largest EU countries in 2010) than spending on RD&D support (about €315 million). Consequently, basing the policy mix more on empirical evidence could increase the efficiency of innovation policy targeted towards renewable energy technologies

Suggested Citation

  • Georg Zachmann & Amma Serwaah & Michele Peruzzi, 2014. "When and how to support renewables? Letting the data speak," Working Papers 811, Bruegel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bre:wpaper:811
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://bruegel.org/wp-content/uploads/imported/publications/WP_2014_01_renewables_.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hal Hill & Jayant Menon, 2014. "Financial safety nets in Asia: genesis, evolution, adequacy and way forward," Chapters,in: New Global Economic Architecture, chapter 5, pages 83-111 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. William Allen & Richhild Moessner, 2010. "Central bank co-operation and international liquidity in the financial crisis of 2008-9," BIS Working Papers 310, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Linda S. Goldberg & Craig Kennedy & Jason Miu, 2011. "Central bank dollar swap lines and overseas dollar funding costs," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue May, pages 3-20.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:gam:jeners:v:10:y:2017:i:12:p:2131-:d:122976 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Witajewski-Baltvilks, Jan & Verdolini, Elena & Tavoni, Massimo, 2015. "Bending the learning curve," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(S1), pages 86-99.
    3. Sam, Aflaki & Syed Abul, Basher & Andrea, Masini, 2016. "Does economic growth matter? Technology-push, demand-pull and endogenous drivers of innovation in the renewable energy industry," MPRA Paper 69773, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Marc Baudry & Clément Bonnet, 2015. "Market pull instruments and the development of wind power in Europe: a counterfactual analysis," EconomiX Working Papers 2015-18, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bre:wpaper:811. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bruegel). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/bruegbe.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.