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Consensus And Singlepeakedness

Author

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  • Muhammad Mahajne

    (BGU)

  • Oscar Volij

    (BGU)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Muhammad Mahajne & Oscar Volij, 2017. "Consensus And Singlepeakedness," Working Papers 1702, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bgu:wpaper:1702
    as

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    File URL: http://in.bgu.ac.il/en/humsos/Econ/Workingpapers/1702.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nitzan,Shmuel, 2009. "Collective Preference and Choice," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521897259.
    2. Gaertner,Wulf, 2006. "Domain Conditions in Social Choice Theory," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521028745.
    3. Anthony Downs, 1957. "An Economic Theory of Political Action in a Democracy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65, pages 135-135.
    4. Nitzan,Shmuel, 2009. "Collective Preference and Choice," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521722131.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Diss, Mostapha & Mahajne, Muhammad, 2020. "Social acceptability of Condorcet committees," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 14-27.

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