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Education and socioeconomic mobility in post-communist countries

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  • Alina Verashchagina

Abstract

Patterns of intergenerational educational mobility are studied in thirteen post-communist countries of Central Europe and the former Soviet Union. No clear trend in educational inheritance emerges over the recent 50 years, covering both the period of socialism and transition to a market economy. This is contrary to expectations formed by the existing literature that claims considerable weakening of the correlation between parental education and that of their children during the period of socialism. If any, we find the decrease in intergenerational persistance up until the generation of the 1950s. In subsequent years no further decline is observed. On the contrary in a number of states the correlation between parentsÂ’ and childrenÂ’s schooling got stronger, further increasing over the period of transition.

Suggested Citation

  • Alina Verashchagina, 2009. "Education and socioeconomic mobility in post-communist countries," BEROC Working Paper Series 04, Belarusian Economic Research and Outreach Center (BEROC).
  • Handle: RePEc:bel:wpaper:04
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tilman Brück & Damir Esenaliev, 2013. "Post-Socialist Transition and the Intergenerational Transmission of Education in Kyrgyzstan," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1284, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    educational mobility; post-communist economies;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • P27 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Performance and Prospects

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