IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bde/wpaper/1930.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Mapping China’s time-varying house price landscape

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Funke

    (Hamburg University Department of Economics and CESifo Munich)

  • Danilo Leiva-Leon

    (Banco de España)

  • Andrew Tsang

    (Hamburg University Department of Economics)

Abstract

The recent increase in China’s house prices at the national level masks tremendous variation at the city level – a feature largely overlooked in the macroprudential literature. This paper measures the evolving heterogeneity in China’s house price dynamics across 70 major cities and assesses its relationship with housing market characteristics. We gauge the heterogeneity of house price dynamics using a novel regime-switching modelling approach to estimate the time-varying patterns of China’s city-level housing price synchronization. The estimates indicate an increasing synchronization leading up to 2015, and a decoupling pattern thereafter, which is associated to the heterogeneous strength of regional macroprudential policies. After sorting city-level housing prices into four clusters sharing similar cyclical features, we document high synchronization within clusters, but low synchronization among them. The empirical evidence suggests that differentials in the growth of population, income, and air quality are relevant explanatory factors of housing price synchronization among cities.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Funke & Danilo Leiva-Leon & Andrew Tsang, 2019. "Mapping China’s time-varying house price landscape," Working Papers 1930, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
  • Handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:1930
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.bde.es/f/webbde/SES/Secciones/Publicaciones/PublicacionesSeriadas/DocumentosTrabajo/19/Fich/dt1930e.pdf
    File Function: First version, September 2019
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ashvin Ahuja & Lillian Cheung & Gaofeng Han & Nathan Porter & Wenlang Zhang, 2010. "Are House Prices Rising Too Fast in China?," IMF Working Papers 10/274, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Hashem Pesaran, M., 2007. "A pair-wise approach to testing for output and growth convergence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 138(1), pages 312-355, May.
    3. Siqi Zheng & Jing Cao & Matthew Kahn & Cong Sun, 2014. "Real Estate Valuation and Cross-Boundary Air Pollution Externalities: Evidence from Chinese Cities," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 398-414, April.
    4. Du, Zaichao & Zhang, Lin, 2015. "Home-purchase restriction, property tax and housing price in China: A counterfactual analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 188(2), pages 558-568.
    5. Zheng, Siqi & Kahn, Matthew E. & Liu, Hongyu, 2010. "Towards a system of open cities in China: Home prices, FDI flows and air quality in 35 major cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-10, January.
    6. Andrew Abbott & Glauco De Vita, 2012. "Pairwise Convergence of District-level House Prices in London," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 49(4), pages 721-740, March.
    7. Danilo Leiva-Leon, 2017. "Measuring Business Cycles Intra-Synchronization in US: A Regime-switching Interdependence Framework," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 79(4), pages 513-545, August.
    8. Camacho, Maximo & Leiva-Leon, Danilo, 2019. "The Propagation Of Industrial Business Cycles," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 144-177, January.
    9. Del Negro, Marco & Otrok, Christopher, 2007. "99 Luftballons: Monetary policy and the house price boom across U.S. states," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(7), pages 1962-1985, October.
    10. Holmes, Mark J. & Otero, Jesús & Panagiotidis, Theodore, 2011. "Investigating regional house price convergence in the United States: Evidence from a pair-wise approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2369-2376.
    11. John Cotter & Stuart Gabriel & Richard Roll, 2012. "Can metropolitan housing risk be diversified? A cautionary tale from the recent boom and bust," Working Papers 201217, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    12. Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh & Pierre-Olivier Weill, 2010. "Why Has House Price Dispersion Gone Up?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(4), pages 1567-1606.
    13. Ashvin Ahuja & Lillian Cheung & Gaofeng Han & Nathan Porter & Wenlang Zhang, 2010. "Are House Prices Rising Too Fast in China?," Working Papers 1008, Hong Kong Monetary Authority.
    14. Frans M. Dieleman & William A. V. Clark & Marinus C. Deurloo, 2000. "The Geography of Residential Turnover in Twenty-seven Large US Metropolitan Housing Markets, 1985-95," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 37(2), pages 223-245, February.
    15. Bai, ChongEn & Li, Qi & Ouyang, Min, 2014. "Property taxes and home prices: A tale of two cities," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 180(1), pages 1-15.
    16. International Monetary Fund, 2010. "Are House Prices Rising too Fast in Hong Kong SAR?," IMF Working Papers 10/273, International Monetary Fund.
    17. Zheng, Siqi & Kahn, Matthew E., 2008. "Land and residential property markets in a booming economy: New evidence from Beijing," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 743-757, March.
    18. Emanuel Moench & Serena Ng, 2011. "A hierarchical factor analysis of U.S. housing market dynamics," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 14, pages 1-24, February.
    19. Ding Ding & Xiaoyu Huang & Tao Jin & W. Raphael Lam, 2017. "Assessing China’s Residential Real Estate Market," IMF Working Papers 17/248, International Monetary Fund.
    20. Gerald A. Carlino & Robert H. DeFina, 1999. "Do states respond differently to changes in monetary policy?," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Jul, pages 17-27.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Charles Ka Yui Leung & Joe Cho Yiu Ng, 2018. "Macro Aspects of Housing," GRU Working Paper Series GRU_2018_016, City University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics and Finance, Global Research Unit.
    2. Michael Funke & Petar Mihaylovski & Adrian Wende, 2018. "Out of Sync Subnational Housing Markets and Macroprudential Policies," CESifo Working Paper Series 6887, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    house prices; Markov-Switching models; synchronization; China;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:1930. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (María Beiro. Electronic Dissemination of Information Unit. Research Department. Banco de España). General contact details of provider: http://www.bde.es/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.