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Alternative Optimized Monetary Policy Rules in Multi-Sector Small Open Economies: The Role of Real Rigidities


  • Carlos de Resende
  • Ali Dib
  • Maral Kichian


Inflation-targeting central banks around the world often state their inflation objectives with regard to the consumer price index (CPI). Yet the literature on optimal monetary policy based on models with nominal rigidities and more than one sector suggests that CPI inflation is not always the best choice from a social welfare perspective. We revisit this issue in the context of an estimated multi-sector New-Keynesian small open economy model where sectors are heterogeneous along multiple dimensions. With key parameters of the model estimated using data from an inflation targeting economy, namely Canada, we particularly focus on (i) the role of sector-specific real rigidities, specially in the form of factor mobility costs, and (ii) welfare implications of targeting alternative price indices. Our estimations reveal considerable heterogeneity across sectors, and in several dimensions. Moreover, in contrast to existing studies, our welfare analysis comparing simple optimized policy rules based on alternative sectoral inflation rates provides support for CPI-based targeting policies by central banks. Capital mobility costs matter importantly in this regard.

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  • Carlos de Resende & Ali Dib & Maral Kichian, 2010. "Alternative Optimized Monetary Policy Rules in Multi-Sector Small Open Economies: The Role of Real Rigidities," Staff Working Papers 10-9, Bank of Canada.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:10-9

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rhee, Wooheon & Rich, Robert W., 1995. "Inflation and the asymmetric effects of money on output fluctuations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 683-702.
    2. Thoma, Mark A., 1994. "Subsample instability and asymmetries in money-income causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1-2), pages 279-306.
    3. Weise, Charles L, 1999. "The Asymmetric Effects of Monetary Policy: A Nonlinear Vector Autoregression Approach," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(1), pages 85-108, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ruy Lama & Juan Pablo Medina, 2012. "Is Exchange Rate Stabilization an Appropriate Cure for the Dutch Disease?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 8(1), pages 5-46, March.
    2. repec:eee:eecrev:v:101:y:2018:i:c:p:157-180 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Drago Bergholt, 2014. "Foreign shocks in an estimated multi-sector model," Working Papers No 4/2014, Centre for Applied Macro- and Petroleum economics (CAMP), BI Norwegian Business School.
    4. repec:kap:compec:v:51:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10614-016-9630-z is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Chetan Ghate & Sargam Gupta & Debdulal Mallick, 2018. "Terms of Trade Shocks and Monetary Policy in India," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 51(1), pages 75-121, January.
    6. Jiri Bohm & Jan Filacek, 2012. "Price-Level Targeting–A Real Alternative to Inflation Targeting?," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 62(1), pages 2-26, February.
    7. repec:jes:wpaper:y:2012:v:4:p:809-823 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Craighead, William D., 2014. "Monetary rules and sectoral unemployment in open economies," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 277-292.

    More about this item


    Inflation: costs and benefits; Inflation and prices; Inflation targets; Monetary policy framework; Monetary policy implementation;

    JEL classification:

    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance

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