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Musical Chairs: Modelling Noisy Evolution

Author

Listed:
  • Binmore, K.
  • Samuelson, L.
  • Vaughan, R.

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Binmore, K. & Samuelson, L. & Vaughan, R., 1993. "Musical Chairs: Modelling Noisy Evolution," Working papers 9324, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  • Handle: RePEc:att:wimass:9324
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Robson, Arthur J. & Vega-Redondo, Fernando, 1996. "Efficient Equilibrium Selection in Evolutionary Games with Random Matching," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 65-92, July.
    2. Edward Cartwright, 2004. "Contagion and the Emergence of Convention in Small Worlds," Studies in Economics 0414, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    3. N. Williams, 2002. "Stability and Long Run Equilibrium in Stochastic Fictitious Play," Princeton Economic Theory Working Papers cbeeeb49cc8afc83f125df5a8, David K. Levine.
    4. Lawrence Blume & Steven Durlauf, 2003. "Equilibrium Concepts for Social Interaction Models," International Game Theory Review (IGTR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 5(03), pages 193-209.
    5. Temzelides, Theodosios, 1997. "Evolution, coordination, and banking panics," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 163-183, September.
    6. Edward Droste & Robert P. Gilles & Cathleen Johnson, 2000. "Evolution of Conventions in Endogenous Social Networks," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0594, Econometric Society.
    7. Y.M. Kaniovski, 1998. "On Misapplications of Diffusion Approximations in Birth and Death Processes of Noisy Evolution," Working Papers ir98050, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
    8. Ken Binmore & Larry Samuelson, "undated". "Muddling Through: Moisy Equlibrium Selection," ELSE working papers 036, ESRC Centre on Economics Learning and Social Evolution.
    9. Huw Dixon & Ernesto Somma, "undated". "Coordination and Equilibrium selection in mean defined supermodular games under payoff monotonic selection dynamics," Discussion Papers 99/37, Department of Economics, University of York.
    10. Weibull, J├Ârgen W., 1997. "What have we learned from Evolutionary Game Theory so far?," Working Paper Series 487, Research Institute of Industrial Economics, revised 26 Oct 1998.
    11. Gale, John & Binmore, Kenneth G. & Samuelson, Larry, 1995. "Learning to be imperfect: The ultimatum game," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 56-90.
    12. Larry Samuelson, 2002. "Evolution and Game Theory," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 47-66, Spring.
    13. Ken Binmore & Larry Samuelson, 1994. "Muddling Through: Noisy Equilibrium Selection," Game Theory and Information 9410002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Angelo Antoci & Pier Sacco, 1995. "A public contracting evolutionary game with corruption," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 61(2), pages 89-122, June.
    15. Sandholm, William H., 2007. "Pigouvian pricing and stochastic evolutionary implementation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 132(1), pages 367-382, January.
    16. Ken Binmore & Larry Samuelson, "undated". "Evolutionary Drift and Equilibrium Selection," ELSE working papers 011, ESRC Centre on Economics Learning and Social Evolution.
    17. Simon P. Anderson & Jacob K. Goeree & Charles A. Holt, 1999. "Stochastic Game Theory: Adjustment to Equilibrium Under Noisy Directional Learning," Virginia Economics Online Papers 327, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
    18. Sandholm,W.H., 1999. "Markov evolution with inexact information," Working papers 15, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    19. Richard Vaughan, "undated". "Evolutive Equilibrium Selection I: Symmetric Two Player Binarychoice Games," ELSE working papers 016, ESRC Centre on Economics Learning and Social Evolution.
    20. Y.M. Kaniovski & G.C. Pflug, 1997. "Limit Theorems for Stationary Distributions of Birth-and-Death Processes," Working Papers ir97041, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.

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    game theory;

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