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Eroding market stability by proliferation of financial instruments

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  • Fabio Caccioli
  • Matteo Marsili
  • Pierpaolo Vivo

Abstract

We contrast Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT), the theoretical basis for the development of financial instruments, with a dynamical picture of an interacting market, in a simple setting. The proliferation of financial instruments apparently provides more means for risk diversification, making the market more efficient and complete. In the simple market of interacting traders discussed here, the proliferation of financial instruments erodes systemic stability and it drives the market to a critical state characterized by large susceptibility, strong fluctuations and enhanced correlations among risks. This suggests that the hypothesis of APT may not be compatible with a stable market dynamics. In this perspective, market stability acquires the properties of a common good, which suggests that appropriate measures should be introduced in derivative markets, to preserve stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabio Caccioli & Matteo Marsili & Pierpaolo Vivo, 2009. "Eroding market stability by proliferation of financial instruments," Papers 0910.0064, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:0910.0064
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    Cited by:

    1. Aikman, David & Galesic, Mirta & Gigerenzer, Gerd & Kapadia, Sujit & Katsikopoulos, Konstantinos & Kothiyal, Amit & Murphy, Emma & Neumann, Tobias, 2014. "Financial Stability Paper No 28: Taking uncertainty seriously - simplicity versus complexity in financial regulation," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 28, Bank of England.
    2. Gualdi, Stanislao & Tarzia, Marco & Zamponi, Francesco & Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe, 2015. "Tipping points in macroeconomic agent-based models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 29-61.
    3. Caccioli, Fabio & Marsili, Matteo, 2010. "Information efficiency and financial stability," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 4, pages 1-20.
    4. Jana Bielagk & Arnaud Lionnet & Gonçalo Dos Reis, 2015. "Equilibrium pricing under relative performance concerns," Working Papers hal-01245812, HAL.
    5. Marco D'Errico & Gulnur Muradoglu & Silvana Stefani & Giovanni Zambruno, 2014. "Opinion Dynamics and Price Formation: a Nonlinear Network Model," Papers 1408.0308, arXiv.org.
    6. Annika Westphal, 2015. "Systemic Risk in the European Union: A Network Approach to Banks’ Sovereign Debt Exposures," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(3), pages 1-36, July.
    7. Jana Bielagk & Arnaud Lionnet & Goncalo Dos Reis, 2015. "Equilibrium pricing under relative performance concerns," Papers 1511.04218, arXiv.org, revised Feb 2017.
    8. Aikman, David & Galesic, Mirta & Gigerenzer, Gerd & Kapadia, Sujit & Katsikopolous, Konstantinos & Kothiyal, Amit & Murphy, Emma & Neumann, Tobias, 2014. "Taking Uncertainty Seriously: Simplicity versus Complexity in Financial Regulation," MPRA Paper 59908, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Silva, Walmir & Kimura, Herbert & Sobreiro, Vinicius Amorim, 2017. "An analysis of the literature on systemic financial risk: A survey," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 91-114.
    10. Timothy Johnson, 2015. "Reciprocity as a Foundation of Financial Economics," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 131(1), pages 43-67, September.
    11. Timothy C. Johnson, 2013. "Reciprocity as the foundation of Financial Economics," Papers 1310.2798, arXiv.org.
    12. Marco Bardoscia & Stefano Battiston & Fabio Caccioli & Guido Caldarelli, 2015. "DebtRank: A microscopic foundation for shock propagation," Papers 1504.01857, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2015.

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