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Biodiversity Conservation: Concepts and Economic Issues with Chinese Examples

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  • Tisdell, Clement A.

Abstract

After touching on the concerns of natural scientists about biodiversity loss, this article argues that it is a mistake to believe that there are only losses of biodiversity. The process of changes in the stock of biodiversity is more complex. Furthermore, it is pointed out that not all genetic material is an economic asset. Also, it is contended that not all genetic material is natural. Some of the genetic stock is of a heritage type and a portion has recently been developed by human beings. Improved conceptualisation of the stock of biodiversity is needed. Some of the ways are listed in which economics is relevant to issues involving biodiversity conservation. General economic factors, such as market extension and economic growth, which result in loss of genetic diversity among domesticated organisms are outlined. China’s recent experience with biodiversity loss highlights the importance of these factors. Some important reasons why economic factors result in biodiversity loss in the wild are identified and reasons are given why economic systems conserve less biodiversity than is ideal. Before concluding, the subject is discussed of what genetic material and other components of biodiversity should be conserved given economic constraints on what can be conserved.

Suggested Citation

  • Tisdell, Clement A., 2012. "Biodiversity Conservation: Concepts and Economic Issues with Chinese Examples," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 140863, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uqseee:140863
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/140863
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tisdell, Clem, 1990. "Economics and the debate about preservation of species, crop varieties and genetic diversity," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 77-90, April.
    2. Tisdell, Clem & Swarna Nantha, Hemanath, 2011. "Comparative costs and conservation of wild species in situ, e.g. orangutans," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 2429-2436.
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    Keywords

    agricultural biodiversity; biodiversity change; biodiversity economics; biological extinction; China; economics of biodiversity loss; genetic diversity as an asset.; Environmental Economics and Policy; Q57; Q10;

    JEL classification:

    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics
    • Q10 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - General

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