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Farmers' Decision Processes And Adoption Of Conservation Tillage

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  • Westra, John V.
  • Olson, Kent D.

Abstract

In a transect survey of crop residue levels in 1995 and 1996, two Minnesota counties had very different percentages of cropland with desired residue cover even though the soil types were similar. To gain a better understanding of the reasons behind this difference, the farmers in these two counties were surveyed about their use or lack of use of conservation tillage practices. A statistical logit analysis of survey responses showed farmers are more apt to adopt conservation tillage if they are larger; are more concerned about erosion on their land; have made a recent major investment in the farm; use other producers for tillage information; have the management skill for conservation tillage; and believe conservation tillage will fit with their production goals and the physical setting of their farm. Two counterintuitive findings are the negative effects of the ease of finding information and the degree of control of the adoption decision. The costs and labor requirements of conservation tillage were important but not as statistically significant as those factors just listed. Some variables, that are often listed as potentially important factors, were not found to be important in this survey. These included the long-term viability of the farm; the age, education, and experience of the farmer; the debt level of the farm; whether a family member wanted to continue farming; the proportion of land rented; the use of other sources for tillage information; the complexity of conservation tillage practices; the producer's planning horizon; the risk of negative returns; the availability of support for conservation tillage systems; and the quality of conservation tillage information.

Suggested Citation

  • Westra, John V. & Olson, Kent D., 1997. "Farmers' Decision Processes And Adoption Of Conservation Tillage," Staff Papers 13380, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:umaesp:13380
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/13380
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Schunk & Bruce Hannon, 2004. "Impacts of a carbon tax policy on Illinois grain farms: a dynamic simulation study," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 6(3), pages 221-247, September.
    2. Francis H. D'Emden & Rick S. Llewellyn & Michael P. Burton, 2008. "Factors influencing adoption of conservation tillage in Australian cropping regions ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(2), pages 169-182, June.
    3. Knowler, Duncan & Bradshaw, Ben, 2007. "Farmers' adoption of conservation agriculture: A review and synthesis of recent research," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 25-48, February.
    4. Mitchell, Paul David, 1999. "The theory and practice of green insurance: insurance to encourage the adoption of corn rootworm IPM," ISU General Staff Papers 1999010108000013154, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    5. Solis, Daniel & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Quiroga, Ricardo E., 2006. "The Effect Of Soil Conservation On Technical Efficiency: Evidence From Central America," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21345, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Uri, Noel D., 1999. "Energy and the use of conservation tillage in US agriculture," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 299-306, May.
    7. Boris E. Bravo-Ureta & Horacio Cocchi & Daniel Solís, 2006. "Adoption of Soil Conservation Technologies in El Salvador: A Cross-Section and Over-Time Analysis," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2894, Inter-American Development Bank.
    8. Boris E. Bravo-Ureta & Daniel Solís & Horacio Cocchi & Ricardo E. Quiroga, 2006. "The impact of soil conservation and output diversification on farm income in Central American hillside farming," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 267-276, November.
    9. Kelly A. Davey & W. Hartley Furtan, 2008. "Factors That Affect the Adoption Decision of Conservation Tillage in the Prairie Region of Canada," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 56(3), pages 257-275, September.
    10. Boris Bravo & Horacio Cocchi & Daniel Solís, 2006. "Adoption of Soil Conservation Technologies in El Salvador: A cross-Section and Over-Time Analysis," OVE Working Papers 1806, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
    11. Wade, Tara & Kurkalova, Lyubov A. & Secchi, Silvia, 2012. "Using the logit model with aggregated choice data in estimation of Iowa corn farmers’ conservation tillage subsidies," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124974, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Rahelizatovo, Noro C. & Gillespie, Jeffrey M., 2002. "Factors Influencing The Implementation Of Best Management Practices In The Dairy Industry," 2003 Annual Meeting, February 1-5, 2003, Mobile, Alabama 35241, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    13. Uri, Noel D., 1998. "Impact of the price of energy on the use of conservation tillage in agriculture in the USA," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 225-240, August.

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    Keywords

    Crop Production/Industries;

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