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The Demand For Private Property Rights: Land Titling, Credit, And Agricultural Productivity In Mexico

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  • Johnson, Nancy L.

Abstract

Land titles can increase agricultural productivity by increasing access to collateralized credit. However, increased credit use depends on the assumption that farmers face asset-based credit rationing. This assumption is tested using data from Mexico's voluntary land titling program. The results do not support the existence of widespread credit rationing.

Suggested Citation

  • Johnson, Nancy L., 1998. "The Demand For Private Property Rights: Land Titling, Credit, And Agricultural Productivity In Mexico," 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT 20998, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea98:20998
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lopez, Ramon & Nash, John & Stanton, Julie, 1995. "Adjustment and poverty in Mexican agriculture : how farmers'wealth affects supply response," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1494, The World Bank.
    2. Gershon Feder & Tongroj Onchan, 1987. "Land Ownership Security and Farm Investment in Thailand," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 69(2), pages 311-320.
    3. Kochar, Anjini, 1997. "An empirical investigation of rationing constraints in rural credit markets in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 339-371, August.
    4. Udry, Christopher, 1990. "Credit Markets in Northern Nigeria: Credit as Insurance in a Rural Economy," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 4(3), pages 251-269, September.
    5. Gershon Feder & Lawrence J. Lau & Justin Y. Lin & Xiaopeng Luo, 1990. "The Relationship between Credit and Productivity in Chinese Agriculture: A Microeconomic Model of Disequilibrium," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 72(5), pages 1151-1157.
    6. Feder, Gershon & Lau, Lawrence J. & Lin, Justin Y. & Xiaopeng Luo, 1991. "Credit's effect on productivity in Chinese agriculture : a microeconomic model of disequilibrium," Policy Research Working Paper Series 571, The World Bank.
    7. Michael Roth & Richard Barrows & Michael Carter & Don Kanel, 1989. "Land Ownership Security and Farm Investment: Comment," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 71(1), pages 211-214.
    8. Carter, Michael R., 1988. "Equilibrium credit rationing of small farm agriculture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 83-103, February.
    9. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
    10. Otsuka, Keijiro & Chuma, Hiroyuki & Hayami, Yujiro, 1992. "Land and Labor Contracts in Agrarian Economies: Theories and Facts," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 1965-2018, December.
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    Keywords

    Land Economics/Use;

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