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The Social Dimension of the Learning Economy

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  • Bengt-Åke Lundvall

Abstract

This paper is a slightly revised version of Bengt-Åke Lundvall's Inaugural Lecture, the 10th of November at Department for Business Studies, Aalborg University. The general message is that the growing frequency of so-called paradoxes in economic theory and of unsolved socioeconomic problems reflects that neither economic theory nor policy has been adapted to the fact that we have entered a new phase: the 'Learning Economy'. It is shown that in the learning economy the capacity to learn increasingly determines the relative position of individuals, firms and national systems. The growing polarisation in the OECD-labour markets is explained by the increasing importance of learning and the acceleration in the rate of change. Finally, it is argued that the learning economy will not be sustainable if these tendencies are not countered by a New New Deal which puts the focus on the distribution of capabilities to learn

Suggested Citation

  • Bengt-Åke Lundvall, 1996. "The Social Dimension of the Learning Economy," DRUID Working Papers 96-1, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:aal:abbswp:96-1
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    File URL: http://www3.druid.dk/wp/19960001.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pavitt, Keith, 1991. "What makes basic research economically useful?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 109-119, April.
    2. Arrow, Kenneth J, 1994. "Methodological Individualism and Social Knowledge," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 1-9, May.
    3. Carter, Anne P., 1989. "Knowhow trading as economic exchange," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 155-163, June.
    4. Bengt-ake Lundvall & Bjorn Johnson, 1994. "The Learning Economy," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 23-42.
    5. Freeman, C., 1991. "Networks of innovators: A synthesis of research issues," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 499-514, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations

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