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Hauke H. Vierke

Personal Details

First Name:Hauke
Middle Name:H.
Last Name:Vierke
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pvi346
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/haukevierke/
Terminal Degree:2015 Faculteit Economie en Bedrijfskunde; Universiteit Gent (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Directorate-General Economic and Financial Affairs
European Commission

Bruxelles/Brussel, Belgium
https://ec.europa.eu/info/departments/economic-and-financial-affairs_en


+32 2 298.08.23
Inter-institutional relations and communication Unit, B-1049 Brussels
RePEc:edi:dg2ecbe (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Martin Iseringhausen & Hauke Vierke, 2018. "What Drives Output Volatility? The Role of Demographics and Government Size Revisited," European Economy - Discussion Papers 2015 - 075, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  2. Hauke Vierke & Maarten Masselink, 2017. "The Dutch Budgetary Framework and the European Fiscal Rules," European Economy - Economic Briefs 027, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  3. Gerdie Everaert & Hauke Vierke, 2015. "Demographics And Business Cycle Volatility A Spurious Relationship?," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 15/914, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  4. Tino Berger & Gerdie Everaert & Hauke Vierke, 2015. "Testing for time variation in an unobserved components model for the U.S. economy," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 15/903, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

Articles

  1. Martin Iseringhausen & Hauke Vierke, 2019. "What Drives Output Volatility? The Role of Demographics and Government Size Revisited," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 81(4), pages 849-867, August.
  2. Berger, Tino & Vierke, Hauke, 2017. "Estimating The Natural Rate Of Hours," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(6), pages 1426-1453, September.
  3. Gerdie Everaert & Hauke Vierke, 2016. "Demographics and Business Cycle Volatility: A Spurious Relationship?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(7), pages 1467-1477, November.
  4. Berger, Tino & Everaert, Gerdie & Vierke, Hauke, 2016. "Testing for time variation in an unobserved components model for the U.S. economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 179-208.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Wikipedia or ReplicationWiki mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Gerdie Everaert & Hauke Vierke, 2016. "Demographics and Business Cycle Volatility: A Spurious Relationship?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(7), pages 1467-1477, November.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Demographics and Business Cycle Volatility: A Spurious Relationship? (Journal of Applied Econometrics 2016) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Martin Iseringhausen & Hauke Vierke, 2018. "What Drives Output Volatility? The Role of Demographics and Government Size Revisited," European Economy - Discussion Papers 2015 - 075, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.

    Cited by:

    1. Tony Cavoli & Sasidaran Gopalan & Ramkishen S. Rajan, 2020. "Does Financial Inclusion Amplify Output Volatility in Emerging and Developing Economies?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 31(4), pages 901-930, September.

  2. Gerdie Everaert & Hauke Vierke, 2015. "Demographics And Business Cycle Volatility A Spurious Relationship?," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 15/914, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Iseringhausen & Hauke Vierke, 2018. "What Drives Output Volatility? The Role of Demographics and Government Size Revisited," European Economy - Discussion Papers 2015 - 075, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    2. Lorenzo Carbonari & Vincenzo Atella & Paola Samà, 2018. "Hours worked in selected OECD countries: an empirical assessment," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 525-545, July.
    3. Mario Holzner & Stefan Jestl & David Pichler, 2019. "Public and Private Pension Systems and Macroeconomic Volatility in OECD Countries," wiiw Working Papers 172, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.

  3. Tino Berger & Gerdie Everaert & Hauke Vierke, 2015. "Testing for time variation in an unobserved components model for the U.S. economy," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 15/903, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Iseringhausen & Hauke Vierke, 2018. "What Drives Output Volatility? The Role of Demographics and Government Size Revisited," European Economy - Discussion Papers 2015 - 075, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    2. Joshua C.C. Chan & Angelia L. Grant, 2016. "Reconciling output gaps: unobserved components model and Hodrick-Prescott filter," CAMA Working Papers 2016-44, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    3. Gerdie Everaert & Martin Iseringhausen, 2017. "Measuring The International Dimension Of Output Volatility," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 17/928, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    4. Luís Aguiar-Conraria & Manuel M. F. Martins & Maria Joana Soares, 2019. "The Phillips Curve at 60: time for time and frequency," CEF.UP Working Papers 1902, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    5. Luís Aguiar-Conraria & Manuel M. F. Martins & Maria Joana Soares, 2019. "Okun’s Law Across Time and Frequencies," NIPE Working Papers 13/2019, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    6. Weber, Enzo & Gehrke, Britta, 2018. "Identifying Asymmetric Effects of Labor Market Reforms," VfS Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181513, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Michal Andrle & Miroslav Plašil, 2016. "System Priors for Econometric Time Series," IMF Working Papers 2016/231, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Mengheng Li & Irma Hindrayanto, 2018. "Looking for the stars: Estimating the natural rate of interest," Working Paper Series 51, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    9. Andrle, Michal & Plašil, Miroslav, 2018. "Econometrics with system priors," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 134-137.
    10. Huw Dixon & Joshy Easaw & Saeed Heravi, 2020. "Forecasting inflation gap persistence: Do financial sector professionals differ from nonfinancial sector ones?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(3), pages 461-474, July.
    11. Fu, Bowen, 2020. "Is the slope of the Phillips curve time-varying? Evidence from unobserved components models," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 320-340.
    12. Michael O’Grady, 2019. "Estimating the Output, Inflation and Unemployment Gaps in Ireland using Bayesian Model Averaging," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 50(1), pages 35-76.
    13. Grant, Angelia L., 2018. "The Great Recession and Okun's law," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 291-300.

Articles

  1. Martin Iseringhausen & Hauke Vierke, 2019. "What Drives Output Volatility? The Role of Demographics and Government Size Revisited," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 81(4), pages 849-867, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Berger, Tino & Vierke, Hauke, 2017. "Estimating The Natural Rate Of Hours," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(6), pages 1426-1453, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Weber, Enzo & Gehrke, Britta, 2018. "Identifying Asymmetric Effects of Labor Market Reforms," VfS Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181513, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

  3. Gerdie Everaert & Hauke Vierke, 2016. "Demographics and Business Cycle Volatility: A Spurious Relationship?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(7), pages 1467-1477, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Berger, Tino & Everaert, Gerdie & Vierke, Hauke, 2016. "Testing for time variation in an unobserved components model for the U.S. economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 179-208.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2015-04-25 2018-08-13. Author is listed
  2. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2015-04-25. Author is listed

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