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Kevin Thomas Schnepel

Personal Details

First Name:Kevin
Middle Name:Thomas
Last Name:Schnepel
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psc655
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/schnepelecon/

Affiliation

(90%) Department of Economics
Simon Fraser University

Burnaby, Canada
http://www.sfu.ca/economics/

: (778) 782-3508
(778) 782-5944
Burnaby, B.C., V5A 1S6
RePEc:edi:desfuca (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) School of Economics
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
University of Sydney

Sydney, Australia
http://sydney.edu.au/arts/economics/

: 61 +2 9351 5055
61 +2 9351 4341
Sydney, NSW 2006
RePEc:edi:deusyau (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Institute of Labor Economics (IZA)

Bonn, Germany
http://www.iza.org/

:

P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn
RePEc:edi:izaaade (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Schnepel, Kevin T. & Schurer, Stefanie, 2017. "Early Life Health Interventions and Childhood Development: Evidence from Special Care Nursery Assignment in Australia’s Northern Territory," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168240, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  2. Billings, Stephen B. & Schnepel, Kevin T., 2017. "Life After Lead: Effects of Early Interventions for Children Exposed to Lead," IZA Discussion Papers 10872, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  3. Mueller-Smith, Michael & Schnepel, Kevin T., 2016. "Avoiding Convictions: Regression Discontinuity Evidence on Court Deferrals for First-Time Drug Offenders," IZA Discussion Papers 10409, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  4. Billings, Stephen B. & Schnepel, Kevin, 2015. "The Value of a Healthy Home: Lead Paint Remediation and Housing Values," Working Papers 2015-23, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
  5. Schnepel, Kevin, 2014. "Good Jobs and Recidivism," Working Papers 2014-10, University of Sydney, School of Economics.

Articles

  1. Stephen B. Billings & Kevin T. Schnepel, 2018. "Life after Lead: Effects of Early Interventions for Children Exposed to Lead," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(3), pages 315-344, July.
  2. Kevin T. Schnepel, 2018. "Good Jobs and Recidivism," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(608), pages 447-469, February.
  3. Kevin Schnepel, 2017. "Do post-prison job opportunities reduce recidivism?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 399-399, November.
  4. Andrew V. Carter & Kevin T. Schnepel & Douglas G. Steigerwald, 2017. "Asymptotic Behavior of a t -Test Robust to Cluster Heterogeneity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 99(4), pages 698-709, July.
  5. Billings, Stephen B. & Schnepel, Kevin T., 2017. "The value of a healthy home: Lead paint remediation and housing values," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 69-81.
  6. Kevin T. Schnepel, 2016. "Economics of Incarceration," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(4), pages 515-523, December.
  7. Daniel I. Rees & Kevin T. Schnepel, 2009. "College Football Games and Crime," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 10(1), pages 68-87, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Stephen B. Billings & Kevin T. Schnepel, 2018. "Life after Lead: Effects of Early Interventions for Children Exposed to Lead," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(3), pages 315-344, July.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Life after Lead: Effects of Early Interventions for Children Exposed to Lead (AEJ:AE 2018) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Billings, Stephen B. & Schnepel, Kevin T., 2017. "Life After Lead: Effects of Early Interventions for Children Exposed to Lead," IZA Discussion Papers 10872, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Douglas Almond & Janet Currie & Valentina Duque, 2017. "Childhood Circumstances and Adult Outcomes: Act II," Working Papers 2017-082, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Anna Aizer & Janet Currie & Peter Simon & Patrick Vivier, 2016. "Do Low Levels of Blood Lead Reduce Children's Future Test Scores?," NBER Working Papers 22558, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Billings, Stephen B. & Schnepel, Kevin T., 2017. "The Value of a Healthy Home: Lead Paint Remediation and Housing Values," IZA Discussion Papers 10873, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Clay, Karen & Portnykh, Margarita & Severnini, Edson R., 2019. "The Legacy Lead Deposition in Soils and Its Impact on Cognitive Function in Preschool-Aged Children in the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 12178, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Benjamin Elsner & Florian Wozny, 2019. "The Human Capital Cost of Radiation: Long-run Evidence from Exposure outside the Womb," CINCH Working Paper Series 1901, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health.
    6. Karen Clay & Margarita Portnykh & Edson Severnini, 2018. "Toxic Truth: Lead and Fertility," NBER Working Papers 24607, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Anna Aizer & Janet Currie, 2017. "Lead and Juvenile Delinquency: New Evidence from Linked Birth, School and Juvenile Detention Records," NBER Working Papers 23392, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Federico Curci & Federico Masera, 2018. "Flight from urban blight: lead poisoning, crime and suburbanization," Working Papers 2018/09, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    9. Elsner, Benjamin & Wozny, Florian, 2018. "The Human Capital Cost of Radiation: Long-Run Evidence from Exposure Outside the Womb," IZA Discussion Papers 11408, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  2. Billings, Stephen B. & Schnepel, Kevin, 2015. "The Value of a Healthy Home: Lead Paint Remediation and Housing Values," Working Papers 2015-23, University of Sydney, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Ortega, Francesc & Taṣpınar, Süleyman, 2018. "Rising sea levels and sinking property values: Hurricane Sandy and New York’s housing market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 81-100.

  3. Schnepel, Kevin, 2014. "Good Jobs and Recidivism," Working Papers 2014-10, University of Sydney, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Cody Tuttle, 2019. "Snapping Back: Food Stamp Bans and Criminal Recidivism," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 301-327, May.
    2. Jennifer L. Doleac & Benjamin Hansen, 2016. "Does “Ban the Box” Help or Hurt Low-Skilled Workers? Statistical Discrimination and Employment Outcomes When Criminal Histories are Hidden," NBER Working Papers 22469, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Galbiati, Roberto & Ouss, Aurélie & Philippe, Arnaud, 2017. "Jobs, News and Re-offending after Incarceration," TSE Working Papers 17-843, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    4. Amanda Y. Agan & Michael D. Makowsky, 2018. "The Minimum Wage, EITC, and Criminal Recidivism," NBER Working Papers 25116, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Joshua M. Congdon-Hohman, 2018. "The persistent labor market effects of a criminal conviction and “Ban the Box” reforms," Working Papers 1808, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    6. Jackson, Osborne & Zhao, Bo, 2017. "Does changing employers’ access to criminal histories affect ex-offenders’ recidivism?: evidence from the 2010–2012 Massachusetts CORI Reform," Working Papers 16-31, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    7. Kevin Schnepel, 2017. "Do post-prison job opportunities reduce recidivism?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 399-399, November.
    8. Christine Braun, 2019. "Crime and the minimum wage," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 32, pages 122-152, April.
    9. Joseph J. Sabia & Taylor Mackay & Thanh Tam Nguyen & Dhaval M. Dave, 2018. "Do Ban the Box Laws Increase Crime?," NBER Working Papers 24381, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Stephen B. Billings & Kevin T. Schnepel, 2018. "Life after Lead: Effects of Early Interventions for Children Exposed to Lead," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(3), pages 315-344, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Kevin T. Schnepel, 2018. "Good Jobs and Recidivism," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(608), pages 447-469, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Andrew V. Carter & Kevin T. Schnepel & Douglas G. Steigerwald, 2017. "Asymptotic Behavior of a t -Test Robust to Cluster Heterogeneity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 99(4), pages 698-709, July.

    Cited by:

    1. James G. MacKinnon, 2014. "Wild Cluster Bootstrap Confidence Intervals," Working Paper 1329, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    2. B. James Deaton & Chad Lawley & Karthik Nadella, 2018. "Renters, landlords, and farmland stewardship," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 49(4), pages 521-531, July.
    3. James G. MacKinnon & Matthew D. Webb & Morten Ø. Nielsen, 2017. "Bootstrap And Asymptotic Inference With Multiway Clustering," Working Paper 1386, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    4. Heiko T. Burret & Lars P. Feld, 2014. "Vertical Effects of Fiscal Rules - The Swiss Experience," CESifo Working Paper Series 5043, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. David Roodman & James G. MacKinnon & Matthew D. Webb & Morten Ø. Nielsen, 2018. "Fast And Wild: Bootstrap Inference In Stata Using Boottest," Working Paper 1406, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    6. A. Colin Cameron & Douglas L. Miller, 2015. "A Practitioner’s Guide to Cluster-Robust Inference," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(2), pages 317-372.
    7. Frank Davenport, 2017. "Estimating standard errors in spatial panel models with time varying spatial correlation," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 96, pages 155-177, March.
    8. James G. MacKinnon & Matthew D. Webb, 2015. "Wild Bootstrap Inference For Wildly Different Cluster Sizes," Working Paper 1314, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    9. Jungbin Hwang, 2017. "Simple and Trustworthy Cluster-Robust GMM Inference," Working papers 2017-19, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    10. Slawa Rokicki & Jessica Cohen & Günther Fink & Joshua A. Salomon & Mary Beth Landrum, 2018. "Inference with difference-in-differences with a small number of groups: a review, simulation study and empirical application using SHARE data," Working Papers 201802, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    11. Ivan A. Canay & Andres Santos & Azeem M. Shaikh, 2018. "The wild bootstrap with a "small" number of "large" clusters," CeMMAP working papers CWP27/18, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    12. Burret, Heiko T. & Feld, Lars P., 2018. "(Un-)intended effects of fiscal rules," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 166-191.
    13. Laurent Davezies & Xavier D'Haultfoeuille & Yannick Guyonvarch, 2018. "Asymptotic results under multiway clustering," Papers 1807.07925, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2018.
    14. Bruce E. Hansen & Seojeong Lee, 2019. "Asymptotic Theory for Clustered Samples," Papers 1902.01497, arXiv.org.
    15. Heiko T. Burret & Lars P. Feld & Christoph A. Schaltegger, 2018. "Fiscal Federalism and Economic Performance - New Evidence from Switzerland," CESifo Working Paper Series 7250, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. Bartel, Ann P. & Rossin-Slater, Maya & Ruhm, Christopher J. & Stearns, Jenna & Waldfogel, Jane, 2015. "Paid Family Leave, Fathers' Leave-Taking, and Leave-Sharing in Dual-Earner Households," IZA Discussion Papers 9530, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Stephen B. Billings & Kevin T. Schnepel, 2018. "Life after Lead: Effects of Early Interventions for Children Exposed to Lead," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(3), pages 315-344, July.
    18. Antoine A. Djogbenou & James G. MacKinnon & Morten Ørregaard Nielsen, 2019. "Asymptotic Theory and Wild Bootstrap Inference with Clustered Errors," CREATES Research Papers 2019-05, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    19. James G. MacKinnon & Matthew D. Webb, 2017. "Pitfalls When Estimating Treatment Effects Using Clustered Data," Working Paper 1387, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    20. Sönke Hendrik Matthewes, 2018. "Better Together? Heterogeneous Effects of Tracking on Student Achievement," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1775, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    21. Andreas Hagemann, 2019. "Permutation inference with a finite number of heterogeneous clusters," Papers 1907.01049, arXiv.org.
    22. Clement de Chaisemartin & Luc Behaghel, 2015. "Estimating the effect of treatments allocated by randomized waiting lists," Papers 1511.01453, arXiv.org, revised Oct 2018.
    23. Antoine A. Djogbenou & James G. MacKinnon & Morten Ø. Nielsen, 2017. "Validity Of Wild Bootstrap Inference With Clustered Errors," Working Paper 1383, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    24. James G. MacKinnon & Morten Ø. Nielsen & Matthew D. Webb, 2019. "Wild Bootstrap and Asymptotic Inference with Multiway Clustering," Working Paper 1415, Economics Department, Queen's University.

  4. Billings, Stephen B. & Schnepel, Kevin T., 2017. "The value of a healthy home: Lead paint remediation and housing values," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 69-81.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Daniel I. Rees & Kevin T. Schnepel, 2009. "College Football Games and Crime," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 10(1), pages 68-87, February.

    Cited by:

    1. David Card & Gordon Dahl, 2009. "Family Violence and Football: The Effect of Unexpected Emotional Cues on Violent Behavior," NBER Working Papers 15497, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Alex Dickson & Colin Jennings & Gary Koop, 2013. "Domestic Violence and Football in Glasgow: Are Reference Points Relevant?," Working Papers 1301, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    3. Joshua C. Hall & Hyunqoong Pyun, 2016. "Does the Presence of Professional Football Cause Crime in a City? Evidence from Pontiac, Michigan," Working Papers 16-02, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    4. Ge, Qi, 2018. "Sports sentiment and tipping behavior," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 95-113.
    5. Jason M. Lindo & Charles Stoecker, 2014. "Drawn Into Violence: Evidence On “What Makes A Criminal” From The Vietnam Draft Lotteries," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(1), pages 239-258, January.
    6. Doerrenberg, Philipp & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2014. "Is soccer good for you? The motivational impact of big sporting events on the unemployed," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 66-69.
    7. Mocan, Naci & Raschke, Christian, 2014. "Economic Well-being and Anti-Semitic, Xenophobic, and Racist Attitudes in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 8126, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Daniel Montolio & Simón Planells-Struse, 2015. "How time shapes crime: the temporal impacts of football matches on crime," Working Papers 2015/10, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    9. Thomas Cornelissen & Oliver Himmler & Tobias König, 2010. "Fairness Spillovers - The Case of Taxation," CESifo Working Paper Series 3217, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Lindo, Jason M. & Siminski, Peter & Swensen, Isaac D., 2016. "College Party Culture and Sexual Assault," IZA Discussion Papers 9700, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Christopher Carpenter & Carlos Dobkin, 2010. "Alcohol Regulation and Crime," NBER Chapters,in: Controlling Crime: Strategies and Tradeoffs, pages 291-329 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. R. Todd Jewell & Rob Simmons & Stefan Szymanski, 2014. "Bad for Business? The Effects of Hooliganism on English Professional Football Clubs," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 15(5), pages 429-450, October.
    13. Naci Mocan & Christian Raschke, 2016. "Economic well-being and anti-Semitic, xenophobic, and racist attitudes in Germany," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 1-63, February.
    14. Rhodes, M. Taylor, 2013. "Pigskin, Tailgating and Pollution: Estimating the Environmental Impacts of Sporting Events," UNCG Economics Working Papers 13-19, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    15. Jason M. Lindo & Isaac D. Swensen & Glen R. Waddell, 2011. "Are Big-Time Sports a Threat to Student Achievement?," NBER Working Papers 17677, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Radek Janhuba, 2016. "Do Victories and Losses Matter? Effects of Football on Life Satisfaction," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp579, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    17. Michael R. Ward, 2010. "Video Games and Adolescent Fighting," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(3), pages 611-628.
    18. Di Domizio Marco, 2012. "Soccer violence and attendance in Italy: Some empirical evidence on the fidelity card strategy," wp.comunite 0092, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.
    19. Ignacio Munyo, 2014. "Entertainment and Crime," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(3), pages 391-397, August.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (4) 2015-12-20 2017-07-16 2017-07-16 2017-10-08
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (4) 2014-09-29 2015-12-20 2017-07-16 2017-10-08
  3. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (3) 2015-12-20 2017-07-16 2017-07-16
  4. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (2) 2017-07-16 2017-10-08
  5. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2017-10-08
  6. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2014-09-29
  7. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2014-09-29
  8. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2017-01-08

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