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John M. Parman

Personal Details

First Name:John
Middle Name:M.
Last Name:Parman
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppa1012
http://jmparman.people.wm.edu/
Department of Economics College of William & Mary P.O. Box 8795 Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795

Affiliation

(95%) Department of Economics
College of William & Mary

Williamsburg, Virginia (United States)
http://www.wm.edu/economics/

: (757) 221-4311
(757) 221-2390
P.O. Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
RePEc:edi:decwmus (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.nber.org/

: 617-868-3900

1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
RePEc:edi:nberrus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Lisa D. Cook & Trevon D. Logan & John M. Parman, 2017. "Racial Segregation and Southern Lynching," NBER Working Papers 23813, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Trevon Logan & John Parman, 2015. "The National Rise in Residential Segregation," NBER Working Papers 20934, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Lisa Cook & Trevon Logan & John Parman, 2015. "The Mortality Consequences of Distinctively Black Names," NBER Working Papers 21625, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. John Parman, 2013. "Childhood Health and Sibling Outcomes: The Shared Burden and Benefit of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic," NBER Working Papers 19505, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Lisa D. Cook & Trevon D. Logan & John M. Parman, 2013. "Distinctively Black Names in the American Past," NBER Working Papers 18802, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. John Parman, "undated". "Childhood Health and Sibling Outcomes: The Shared Burden of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic," Working Papers 121, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  7. John Parman, "undated". "Gender and Intergenerational Mobility: Using Health Outcomes to Compare Intergenerational Mobility Across Gender and Over Time," Working Papers 122, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.

Articles

  1. Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2018. "Segregation and mortality over time and space," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 199(C), pages 77-86.
  2. Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2017. "The National Rise in Residential Segregation," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(01), pages 127-170, March.
  3. Trevon D. Logan & John M. Parman, 2017. "Segregation and Homeownership in the Early Twentieth Century," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 410-414, May.
  4. Cook, Lisa D. & Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2016. "The mortality consequences of distinctively black names," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 114-125.
  5. Parman, John, 2015. "Childhood health and sibling outcomes: Nurture Reinforcing nature during the 1918 influenza pandemic," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 22-43.
  6. Parman, John, 2015. "Childhood Health and Human Capital: New Evidence from Genetic Brothers in Arms," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 75(01), pages 30-64, March.
  7. Cook, Lisa D. & Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2014. "Distinctively black names in the American past," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 64-82.
  8. Trevon Logan & John Parman, 2014. "The Dynamics of African-American Health: A Historical Perspective," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 299-318, September.
  9. Parman, John, 2012. "Good schools make good neighbors: Human capital spillovers in early 20th century agriculture," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 316-334.
  10. Parman, John, 2011. "American Mobility and the Expansion of Public Education," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(01), pages 105-132, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Lisa D. Cook & Trevon D. Logan & John M. Parman, 2017. "Racial Segregation and Southern Lynching," NBER Working Papers 23813, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Trevon D. Logan, 2018. "Do Black Politicians Matter?," NBER Working Papers 24190, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Andrews, Rodney & Casey, Marcus & Hardy, Bradley L. & Logan, Trevon D., 2017. "Location matters: Historical racial segregation and intergenerational mobility," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 67-72.

  2. Trevon Logan & John Parman, 2015. "The National Rise in Residential Segregation," NBER Working Papers 20934, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Ufuk Akcigit & John Grigsby & Tom Nicholas, 2017. "The Rise of American Ingenuity: Innovation and Inventors of the Golden Age," NBER Working Papers 23047, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Trevon D. Logan, 2018. "Do Black Politicians Matter?," NBER Working Papers 24190, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Campaniello, Nadia & Gray, Rowena & Mastrobuoni, Giovanni, 2016. "Returns to education in criminal organizations: Did going to college help Michael Corleone?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 242-258.
    4. Peter Temin, 2015. "The American Dual Economy: Race, Globalization, and the Politics of Exclusion," Working Papers Series 26, Institute for New Economic Thinking.
    5. Allison Shertzer & Randall P. Walsh, 2016. "Racial Sorting and the Emergence of Segregation in American Cities," NBER Working Papers 22077, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Rohan Alexander & Zachary Ward, 2018. "Age at Arrival and Assimilation during the Age of Mass Migration," CEH Discussion Papers 03, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    7. William J. Collins & Marianne H. Wanamaker, 2017. "Up from Slavery? African American Intergenerational Economic Mobility Since 1880," NBER Working Papers 23395, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Lisa Cook & Trevon Logan & John Parman, 2015. "The Mortality Consequences of Distinctively Black Names," NBER Working Papers 21625, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Jurajda, Štepán & Kova?, Dejan, 2016. "What's in a Name in a War," IZA Discussion Papers 10331, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Claudia Olivetti & M. Daniele Paserman, 2013. "In the Name of the Son (and the Daughter): Intergenerational Mobility in the United States, 1850-1930," NBER Working Papers 18822, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lisa D. Cook & Trevon D. Logan & John M. Parman, 2013. "Distinctively Black Names in the American Past," NBER Working Papers 18802, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Robert A. Margo, 2016. "Obama, Katrina, and the Persistence of Racial Inequality," NBER Working Papers 21933, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. John Parman, 2013. "Childhood Health and Sibling Outcomes: The Shared Burden and Benefit of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic," NBER Working Papers 19505, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Danyelle Branco & Bladimir Carrillo & José G. Féres, 2018. "Birth Endowments And Parental Investments: New Evidence From Twins," Anais do XLIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 44th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 196, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    2. Breining, Sanni & Daysal, N. Meltem & Simonsen, Marianne & Trandafir, Mircea, 2015. "Spillover Effects of Early-Life Medical Interventions," IZA Discussion Papers 9086, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Keith Meyers & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2017. "Paralyzed by Panic: Measuring the Effect of School Closures during the 1916 Polio Pandemic on Educational Attainment," NBER Working Papers 23890, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Bladimir Carrillo Bermudez & João Eustáquio De Lima & Juan C. Trujillo, 2016. "Weather Fluctuations, Early-Life Conditions, And Parental Investments: Evidence From Colombia," Anais do XLIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 43rd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 140, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].

  5. Lisa D. Cook & Trevon D. Logan & John M. Parman, 2013. "Distinctively Black Names in the American Past," NBER Working Papers 18802, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Pedro Carneiro & Sokbae Lee & Hugo Reis, 2016. "Please Call Me John: Name Choice and the Assimilation of Immigrants in the United States, 1900-1930," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1608, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    2. Emily Nix & Nancy Qian, 2015. "The Fluidity of Race: “Passing” in the United States, 1880-1940," NBER Working Papers 20828, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert A. Margo, 2016. "Obama, Katrina, and the Persistence of Racial Inequality," NBER Working Papers 21933, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Cook, Lisa D. & Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2016. "The mortality consequences of distinctively black names," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 114-125.

  6. John Parman, "undated". "Childhood Health and Sibling Outcomes: The Shared Burden of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic," Working Papers 121, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.

    Cited by:

    1. Cheti Nicoletti & Valentina Tonei, 2017. "The response of parental time investments to the child’s skills and health," Discussion Papers 17/08, Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Douglas Almond & Bhashkar Mazumder, 2013. "Fetal origins and parental responses," Working Paper Series WP-2012-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    3. Richter, André & Robling, Per Olof, 2013. "Multigenerational e ffects of the 1918-19 influenza pandemic in Sweden," Working Paper Series 5/2013, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    4. Nicoletti, Cheti & Tonei, Valentina, 2017. "The Response of Parental Time Investments to the Child's Skills and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 10993, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  7. John Parman, "undated". "Gender and Intergenerational Mobility: Using Health Outcomes to Compare Intergenerational Mobility Across Gender and Over Time," Working Papers 122, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.

    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Francois Maystadt & Giuseppe Migali, 2017. "The transmission of health across 7 generations in China, 1789-1906," Working Papers 147116320, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    2. Lisa D. Cook & Trevon D. Logan & John M. Parman, 2013. "Distinctively Black Names in the American Past," NBER Working Papers 18802, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Patrizio Piraino & Sean Muller & Jeanne Cilliers & Johan Fourie, 2013. "The transmission of longevity across generations: The case of the settler Cape Colony," Working Papers 14/2013, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2017. "The National Rise in Residential Segregation," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(01), pages 127-170, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Cook, Lisa D. & Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2016. "The mortality consequences of distinctively black names," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 114-125.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Parman, John, 2015. "Childhood health and sibling outcomes: Nurture Reinforcing nature during the 1918 influenza pandemic," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 22-43.

    Cited by:

    1. KARBOWNIK, Krzysztof & WRAY, Anthony, 2016. "Long-run Consequences of Exposure to Natural Disasters," Discussion paper series HIAS-E-36, Hitotsubashi Institute for Advanced Study, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Ogasawara, Kota, 2017. "Persistence of pandemic influenza on the development of children: Evidence from industrializing Japan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 181(C), pages 43-53.
    3. Brandon J. Restrepo, 2016. "Parental investment responses to a low birth weight outcome: who compensates and who reinforces?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 969-989, October.
    4. Cools, Angela & Patacchini, Eleonora, 2017. "Sibling Gender Composition and Women's Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 11001, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Ran Abramitzky, 2015. "Economics and the Modern Economic Historian," NBER Working Papers 21636, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Zachary Ward, 2016. "The Role of English Fluency in Migrant Assimilation: Evidence from United States History," CEH Discussion Papers 049, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    7. Ran Abramitzky & Roy Mill & Santiago Pérez, 2018. "Linking Individuals Across Historical Sources: a Fully Automated Approach," NBER Working Papers 24324, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Parman, John, 2015. "Childhood Health and Human Capital: New Evidence from Genetic Brothers in Arms," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 75(01), pages 30-64, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Hoyt Bleakley & Dora Costa & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2014. "Health, Education, and Income in the United States, 1820–2000," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital in History: The American Record, pages 121-159 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lisa D. Cook & Trevon D. Logan & John M. Parman, 2013. "Distinctively Black Names in the American Past," NBER Working Papers 18802, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Ewout Depauw & Deborah Oxley, 2017. "Toddlers, teenagers & terminal heights: The determinants of adult male stature Flanders 1800-76," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _157, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    4. Timothy J. Hatton, 2015. "Stature and Sibship: Historical Evidence," CEH Discussion Papers 039, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    5. Parman, John, 2015. "Childhood health and sibling outcomes: Nurture Reinforcing nature during the 1918 influenza pandemic," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 22-43.

  5. Cook, Lisa D. & Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2014. "Distinctively black names in the American past," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 64-82.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Trevon Logan & John Parman, 2014. "The Dynamics of African-American Health: A Historical Perspective," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 299-318, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Cook, Lisa D. & Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2016. "The mortality consequences of distinctively black names," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 114-125.

  7. Parman, John, 2012. "Good schools make good neighbors: Human capital spillovers in early 20th century agriculture," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 316-334.

    Cited by:

    1. Ulloa, Camilo A. & San Juan Mesonada, Carlos & Ball, V. Eldon, 2011. "Agricultural productivity in the United States: catching-up and the business cycle," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1116, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    2. Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2017. "The National Rise in Residential Segregation," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(01), pages 127-170, March.
    3. Andersson, Jens & Berger, Thor, 2016. "Elites and the Expansion of Education in 19th-century Sweden," Lund Papers in Economic History 149, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    4. Ball, V. Eldon & San Juan, Carlos & Ulloa, Camilo, 2012. "State Productivity Growth: Catching Up and the Business Cycle," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 123334, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

  8. Parman, John, 2011. "American Mobility and the Expansion of Public Education," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(01), pages 105-132, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Semrad, Alexandra, 2015. "Educational expansion and social composition of secondary schools: evidence from Bavarian school registries 1810-1890," Discussion Papers in Economics 25261, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    2. Maia Güell & José V. Rodriguez Mora & Chris Telmer, 2007. "Intergenerational mobility and the informative content of surnames," Economics Working Papers 1042, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    3. Nathan D. Grawe, 2010. "Primary and Secondary School Quality and Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(4), pages 331-364.
    4. Maia Güell & José V. Rodríguez Mora & Christopher I. Telmer, 2014. "The Informational Content of Surnames, the Evolution of Intergenerational Mobility and Assortative Mating," Working Papers 2014-19, FEDEA.
    5. Maia Güell & José V. Rodríguez Mora & Christopher I. Telmer, 2014. "Intergenerational Mobility and the Informational Content of Surnames," Working Papers 2014-01, FEDEA.
    6. Liu, Ling & Wan, Qian, 2017. "The Effect of Education Expansion on Intergenerational Mobility of Education: Evidence from China," MPRA Paper 80616, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Claudia Olivetti & M. Daniele Paserman & Laura Salisbury, 2016. "Three-generation Mobility in the United States, 1850-1940: The Role of Maternal and Paternal Grandparents," NBER Working Papers 22094, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Chen, Yuyu & Naidu, Suresh & Yu, Tinghua & Yuchtman, Noam, 2015. "Intergenerational mobility and institutional change in 20th century China," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 44-73.
    9. Jason Long & Joseph Ferrie, 2013. "Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Great Britain and the United States since 1850: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(5), pages 2041-2049, August.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (3) 2013-03-02 2015-02-22 2015-11-07. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2013-03-02 2013-10-11. Author is listed
  3. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2015-02-22 2017-10-01. Author is listed
  4. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2013-10-11. Author is listed
  5. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2017-10-01. Author is listed

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