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Sarah Najm

Personal Details

First Name:Sarah
Middle Name:
Last Name:Najm
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pna661
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/view/sarahnajm-/home
Terminal Degree:2019 Department of Economics; University of Reading (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(90%) Department of Economics
King Saud University

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
http://colleges.ksu.edu.sa/Arabic%20Colleges/AdministrativeSciences/Academic_Departments/Economic_Department/Pages/Department_Home.aspx
RePEc:edi:deksusa (more details at EDIRC)

(10%) Department of Economics
University of Reading

Reading, United Kingdom
http://www.rdg.ac.uk/Economics/
RePEc:edi:derdguk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Najm, Sarah & Matsumoto, Ken'ichi, 2020. "Does renewable energy substitute LNG international trade in the energy transition?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C).
  2. Najm, Sarah, 2019. "The green paradox and budgetary institutions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 133(C).

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Najm, Sarah & Matsumoto, Ken'ichi, 2020. "Does renewable energy substitute LNG international trade in the energy transition?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Ibitoye J. Oyebanji & Ewert P. J. Kleynhans, 2021. "Renewable energy, international trade, carbon dioxide emissions, and economic growth in Nigeria," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2021(2), pages 173-195.
    2. Farag, Markos & Zaki, Chahir, 2021. "On the Determinants of Trade in Natural Gas: A Political Economy Approach," EWI Working Papers 2021-8, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln (EWI).
    3. Guiliang Tian & Suwan Yu & Zheng Wu & Qing Xia, 2022. "Study on the Emission Reduction Effect and Spatial Difference of Carbon Emission Trading Policy in China," Energies, MDPI, vol. 15(5), pages 1-20, March.
    4. Rodrigo Pereira Botão & Hirdan Katarina de Medeiros Costa & Edmilson Moutinho dos Santos, 2023. "Global Gas and LNG Markets: Demand, Supply Dynamics, and Implications for the Future," Energies, MDPI, vol. 16(13), pages 1-14, July.
    5. Michail Nektarios A. & Melas Konstantinos D., 2022. "Geopolitical Risk and the LNG-LPG Trade," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 28(3), pages 243-265, September.
    6. Gi-Young Chae & Seung-Hyun An & Chul-Yong Lee, 2021. "Demand Forecasting for Liquified Natural Gas Bunkering by Country and Region Using Meta-Analysis and Artificial Intelligence," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(16), pages 1-18, August.
    7. Stef, Nicolae & Başağaoğlu, Hakan & Chakraborty, Debaditya & Ben Jabeur, Sami, 2023. "Does institutional quality affect CO2 emissions? Evidence from explainable artificial intelligence models," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C).
    8. Tonmoy Choudhury & Muhammad Kamran & Hadrian Geri Djajadikerta & Tapan Sarker, 2023. "Can Banks Sustain the Growth in Renewable Energy Supply? An International Evidence," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 35(1), pages 20-50, February.

  2. Najm, Sarah, 2019. "The green paradox and budgetary institutions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 133(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Gómez-Bolaños, Efrén & Ellimäki, Pia & Hurtado-Torres, Nuria E. & Delgado-Márquez, Blanca L., 2022. "Internationalization and environmental innovation in the energy sector: Exploring the differences between multinational enterprises from emerging and developed countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 163(C).
    2. He Chang & Huimin Liu & Shuai Jin, 2023. "Design of a river chief incentive mechanism based on blockchain: A principal–agent model," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 44(3), pages 1534-1546, April.
    3. Najm, Sarah & Matsumoto, Ken'ichi, 2020. "Does renewable energy substitute LNG international trade in the energy transition?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C).
    4. Guangming Rao & Bin Su & Jinlian Li & Yong Wang & Yanhua Zhou & Zhaolin Wang, 2019. "Carbon Sequestration Total Factor Productivity Growth and Decomposition: A Case of the Yangtze River Economic Belt of China," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(23), pages 1-28, November.

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