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Jeremy Horpedahl

Personal Details

First Name:Jeremy
Middle Name:
Last Name:Horpedahl
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pho713
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Twitter: @jmhorp

Affiliation

Department of Economics, Finance, and Insurance and Risk Management
University of Central Arkansas

Conway, Arkansas (United States)
http://www.uca.edu/efirm/index.php
RePEc:edi:deucaus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles Chapters

Articles

  1. Jeremy Horpedahl & Arnold Kling, 2020. "Gender, Race and Ethnicity, and Inequality Research in the American Economic Review and the American Economic Association’s Conference Papers," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 17(2), pages 338–349-3, September.
  2. Jeremy Horpedahl, 2019. "Do the poor want to be regulated? Public opinion surveys on regulation in the United States, 1981–2002," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 180(1), pages 27-42, July.
  3. Jeremy Horpedahl & Jeremy Jackson & David Mitchell, 2019. "Is Economic Freedom the Hidden Path to Social Justice?," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 34(Winter 20), pages 55-74.
  4. Jeremy Horpedahl, 2015. "Ideology Über Alles? Economics Bloggers on Uber, Lyft, and Other Transportation Network Companies," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 12(3), pages 360–374-3, September.
  5. Joshua Hall & Jeremy Horpedahl, 2012. "Personally Prudent but Publicly Profligate: Reagan’s Generation and Budget Deficits," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 40(3), pages 349-350, September.
  6. Jeremy Horpedahl, 2012. "Adrian Vermeule: The system of the constitution," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 153(3), pages 507-509, December.
  7. Jeremy Horpedahl, 2011. "Political exchange and the voting franchise: universal democracy as an emergent process," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 203-220, September.
  8. Jason Briggeman & Jeremy Horpedahl, 2009. "Protecting Cultural Monuments Against Terrorism: A Comment," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(6), pages 509-512.

Chapters

  1. Jeremy Horpedahl, 2021. "The Tax Code as an Emergent Phenomenon," Studies in Public Choice, in: David J. Hebert & Diana W. Thomas (ed.), Emergence, Entanglement, and Political Economy, pages 103-110, Springer.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Jeremy Horpedahl, 2019. "Do the poor want to be regulated? Public opinion surveys on regulation in the United States, 1981–2002," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 180(1), pages 27-42, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Gründler & Niklas Potrafke & Timo Wochner, 2020. "Structural Reforms and Income Inequality: Who Benefits From Market-Oriented Reforms?," EconPol Policy Reports 18, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

  2. Jeremy Horpedahl & Jeremy Jackson & David Mitchell, 2019. "Is Economic Freedom the Hidden Path to Social Justice?," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 34(Winter 20), pages 55-74.

    Cited by:

    1. Boris Nikolaev & Daniel L. Bennett, 2020. "Has Economic Growth Made Americans Better Off despite Rising Income Inequality? Evidence from Subjective Well-Being Data," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 35(Fall 2020), pages 63-92.
    2. Sean Alley & Mark Melichar, 2021. "Examining the Impact of Economics Education on Young Americans’ Attitudes about the Economy and Economic Institutions," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 36(Winter 20), pages 21-44.

  3. Jeremy Horpedahl, 2015. "Ideology Über Alles? Economics Bloggers on Uber, Lyft, and Other Transportation Network Companies," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 12(3), pages 360–374-3, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Valeria Andreoni, 2020. "The Trap of Success: A Paradox of Scale for Sharing Economy and Degrowth," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(8), pages 1-17, April.
    2. Qipeng Sun & Yuqi He & Yongjie Wang & Fei Ma, 2019. "Evolutionary Game between Government and Ride-Hailing Platform: Evidence from China," Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society, Hindawi, vol. 2019, pages 1-14, January.
    3. Watanabe, Chihiro & Naveed, Kashif & Neittaanmäki, Pekka, 2016. "Co-evolution of three mega-trends nurtures un-captured GDP – Uber’s ride-sharing revolution," Technology in Society, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 164-185.
    4. Murillo, David & Buckland, Heloise & Val, Esther, 2017. "When the sharing economy becomes neoliberalism on steroids: Unravelling the controversies," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 66-76.

  4. Jeremy Horpedahl, 2011. "Political exchange and the voting franchise: universal democracy as an emergent process," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 203-220, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Tridimas, George, 2012. "How democracy was achieved," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 651-658.
    2. Aidt , T.S. & Franck, R., 2008. "How to Get the Snowball Rolling and Extend the Franchise: Voting on the Great Reform Act of 1832," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0832, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

Chapters

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

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