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Sumayya Goga

Personal Details

First Name:Sumayya
Middle Name:
Last Name:Goga
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgo513
http://www.dpru.uct.ac.za/newsite/?q=node/229

Affiliation

Development Policy Research Unit
School of Economics
Faculty of Commerce
University of Cape Town

Cape Town, South Africa
http://www.dpru.uct.ac.za/
RePEc:edi:dpuctza (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Haroon Bhorat & Sumayya Goga, 2013. "The Gender Wage Gap in Post-Apartheid South Africa: A Re-examination," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(5), pages 827-848, November.
  2. Haroon Bhorat & Sumayya Goga & Carlene Van Der Westhuizen, 2012. "Institutional Wage Effects: Revisiting Union And Bargaining Council Wage Premia In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 80(3), pages 400-414, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Haroon Bhorat & Sumayya Goga, 2013. "The Gender Wage Gap in Post-Apartheid South Africa: A Re-examination," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(5), pages 827-848, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Gradín, 2021. "Occupational Gender Segregation in Post-Apartheid South Africa," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 102-133, July.
    2. Olivier Bargain & P. Kwenda & M. Ntuli, 2018. "Gender bias and the intrahousehold distribution of resources: Evidence from African nuclear households in South Africa," Post-Print hal-03173578, HAL.
    3. Emmanuel Adu Boahen & Paul Adjei Kwakwa & Justice Boateng Dankwah, 2022. "Does gender make a difference in the performance of a small business enterprise? Evidence from a household survey data from Ghana," SN Business & Economics, Springer, vol. 2(9), pages 1-26, September.
    4. Michael Danquah & Abdul Malik Iddrisu & Ernest Owusu Boakye & Solomon Owusu, 2021. "Do gender wage differences within households influence women's empowerment and welfare?: Evidence from Ghana," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2021-40, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Sue Ledwith & Janet Munakamwe, 2015. "Gender, union leadership and collective bargaining: Brazil and South Africa," The Economic and Labour Relations Review, , vol. 26(3), pages 411-429, September.
    6. Margherita Scarlato & Giorgio d'Agostino, 2019. "Cash Transfers, Labor Supply, and Gender Inequality: Evidence from South Africa," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 159-184, October.
    7. Jacqueline Mosomi, 2019. "Distributional changes in the gender wage gap in the post-apartheid South African labour market," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-17, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Koral Zeynep Aktaş & Mercan Murat Anıl, 2021. "Assessing the gender wage gap: Turkey in the years 2002–2019," Economics and Business Review, Sciendo, vol. 7(1), pages 90-112, March.
    9. Vusi Gumede, 2021. "Revisiting Poverty, Human Development and Inequality in Democratic South Africa," Indian Journal of Human Development, , vol. 15(2), pages 183-199, August.
    10. Robert Hill & Tim Köhler, 2021. "Mind the gap: The distributional effects of South Africa’s national lockdown on gender wage inequality," Working Papers 202101, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    11. Haroon Bhorat & Safia Khan, 2018. "Structural Change and Patterns of Inequality in the South African Labour Market," Working Papers 201801, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    12. Melaku Abegaz & Gibson Nene, 2018. "Gender Wage and Productivity Gaps in the Manufacturing Industry. The Case of Ghana," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 37(3), pages 313-326, September.
    13. Sirisha C. Naidu & Lyn Ossome, 2018. "Work, Gender, and Immiseration in South Africa and India," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 50(2), pages 332-348, June.
    14. Sung‐Bou Kim, 2020. "Gender earnings gap among the youth in Malawi," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 32(2), pages 176-187, June.

  2. Haroon Bhorat & Sumayya Goga & Carlene Van Der Westhuizen, 2012. "Institutional Wage Effects: Revisiting Union And Bargaining Council Wage Premia In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 80(3), pages 400-414, September.

    Cited by:

    1. John Knight, 2020. "A Tale of Two Countries and Two Stages: South Africa, China, and the Lewis Model," CSAE Working Paper Series 2020-06, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Dieter von Fintel, 2016. "Institutional wage-setting, labour demand and labour supply: causal estimates from a South African pseudo-panel," Working Papers 07/2016, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    3. Jolan Mohimont, 2019. "Welfare effects of business cycles and monetary policies in a small open emerging economy," Working Paper Research 376, National Bank of Belgium.
    4. Jacqueline Mosomi, 2019. "Distributional changes in the gender wage gap in the post-apartheid South African labour market," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-17, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Deon Filmer & Louise Fox, 2014. "Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa [L’emploi des jeunes en Afrique subsaharienne - Rapport complet]," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 16608, November.
    6. Haroon Bhorat & Karmen Naidoo & Derek Yu, 2014. "Trade Unions in an Emerging Economy: The Case of South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2014-055, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Dieter von Fintel, 2016. "Wage flexibility in a high unemployment regime: spatial heterogeneity and the size of local labour markets," Working Papers 09/2016, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    8. Haroon Bhorat & Natasha Mayet, 2012. "Employment Outcomes and Returns to Earnings in Post-Apartheid South Africa," Working Papers 12152, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    9. Kerr, Andrew & Wittenberg, Martin, 2021. "Union wage premia and wage inequality in South Africa," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 255-271.
    10. Haroon Bhorat & Safia Khan, 2018. "Structural Change and Patterns of Inequality in the South African Labour Market," Working Papers 201801, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    11. Miracle Ntuli & Prudence Kwenda, 2013. "Labour Unions and Wage Inequality Among African Men in South Africa," Working Papers 13159, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    12. Haroon Bhorat, 2012. "A Nation in Search of Jobs: Six Possible Policy Suggestions for Employment Creation in South Africa," Working Papers 12150, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.

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