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Chun-Fang Chiang

Personal Details

First Name:Chun-Fang
Middle Name:
Last Name:Chiang
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pch1706
http://homepage.ntu.edu.tw/~chunfang/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
National Taiwan University

Taipei, Taiwan
http://www.econ.ntu.edu.tw/

(-886-2)-351-5468
(-886-2)-321-5704
21. Hsu-chow Rd. Taipei 100
RePEc:edi:dentutw (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Chun-Fang Chiang & Jason M. Kuo & Megumi Naoi & Jin-Tan Liu, 2020. "What Do Voters Learn from Foreign News? Emulation, Backlash, and Public Support for Trade Agreements," NBER Working Papers 27497, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Chiang, Chun-Fang & Liu, Jin-Tan & Wen, Tsai-Wei, 2018. "National Identity under Economic Integration," GLO Discussion Paper Series 210, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  3. Daniel Bennett & Chun-Fang Chiang & Anup Malani, 2011. "Learning During a Crisis: the SARS Epidemic in Taiwan," NBER Working Papers 16955, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Brian G. Knight & Chun-Fang Chiang, 2008. "Media Bias and Influence: Evidence from Newspaper Endorsements," NBER Working Papers 14445, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Chun-Fang Chiang & Jin-Tan Liu & Tsai-Wei Wen, 2019. "National identity under economic integration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(2), pages 351-367, April.
  2. Bennett, Daniel & Chiang, Chun-Fang & Malani, Anup, 2015. "Learning during a crisis: The SARS epidemic in Taiwan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1-18.
  3. Chun-Fang Chiang & Jin-Tan Liu & Tsai-Wei Wen, 2013. "Individual Preferences for Trade Partners in Taiwan," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 91-109, March.
  4. Chun-Fang Chiang & Brian Knight, 2011. "Media Bias and Influence: Evidence from Newspaper Endorsements," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 78(3), pages 795-820.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography of Economics:
  1. Bennett, Daniel & Chiang, Chun-Fang & Malani, Anup, 2015. "Learning during a crisis: The SARS epidemic in Taiwan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1-18.

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > SARS

Working papers

  1. Chiang, Chun-Fang & Liu, Jin-Tan & Wen, Tsai-Wei, 2018. "National Identity under Economic Integration," GLO Discussion Paper Series 210, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    Cited by:

    1. Stuart Campbell & Ana Nuevo-Chiquero & Gurleen Popli & Anita Ratcliffe, 2019. "Parental ethnic identity and child development," Working Papers 2019003, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    2. Štěpán Jurajda & Dejan Kovač, 2021. "Names and behavior in a war," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 34(1), pages 1-33, January.

  2. Daniel Bennett & Chun-Fang Chiang & Anup Malani, 2011. "Learning During a Crisis: the SARS Epidemic in Taiwan," NBER Working Papers 16955, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Barron, Kai & Gamboa, Luis F. & Rodríguez-Lesmes, Paul, 2019. "Behavioural Response to a Sudden Health Risk: Dengue and Educational Outcomes in Colombia," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 620-644.
    2. Jorge M. Agüero & Trinidad Beleche, 2016. "Health Shocks and the Long-Lasting Change in Health Behaviors: Evidence from Mexico," Working papers 2016-26, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    3. Rangel, Marcos & Nobles, Jenna & Hamoudi, Amar, 2019. "Brazil's Missing Infants: Zika Risk Changes Reproductive Behavior," SocArXiv fu8bp, Center for Open Science.
    4. Li, Yan & Zhang, Qimin, 2020. "The balanced implicit method of preserving positivity for the stochastic SIQS epidemic model," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 538(C).
    5. Agüero, Jorge M. & Beleche, Trinidad, 2017. "Health shocks and their long-lasting impact on health behaviors: Evidence from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in Mexico," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 40-55.
    6. Gavin M. Schwarz & Kuo-Pin Yang & Christine Chou & Yu-Jen Chiu, 2020. "A classification of structural inertia: Variations in structural response," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 33-63, March.
    7. Alberto Ciancio & Fabrice Kämpfen & Iliana V Kohler & Daniel Bennett & Wändi Bruine de Bruin & Jill Darling & Arie Kapteyn & Jürgen Maurer & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2020. "Know your epidemic, know your response: Early perceptions of COVID-19 and self-reported social distancing in the United States," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(9), pages 1-11, September.
    8. Yating Chuang & John Chung-En Liu, 2020. "Who wears a mask? Gender differences in risk behaviors in the COVID-19 early days in Taiwan," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 40(4), pages 2619-2627.
    9. Nathan Yang, 2011. "An Empirical Model of Industry Dynamics with Common Uncertainty and Learning from the Actions of Competitors," Working Papers 11-16, NET Institute.
    10. Mendolia, Silvia & Stavrunova, Olena & Yerokhin, Oleg, 2020. "Determinants of the Community Mobility during the COVID-19 Epidemic: The Role of Government Regulations and Information," IZA Discussion Papers 13778, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  3. Brian G. Knight & Chun-Fang Chiang, 2008. "Media Bias and Influence: Evidence from Newspaper Endorsements," NBER Working Papers 14445, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Stefano DellaVigna & Ruben Durante & Eliana La Ferrara & Brian Knight, 2014. "Market-Based Lobbying: Evidence from Advertising Spending in Italy," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/ismjpe8i38q, Sciences Po.
    2. Papageorge, Nicholas W. & Gershenson, Seth & Kang, Kyungmin, 2016. "Teacher Expectations Matter," IZA Discussion Papers 10165, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Bernhardt, Lea & Dewenter, Ralf & Thomas, Tobias, 2020. "Watchdog or Loyal Servant? Political Media Bias in US Newscasts," Working Paper 183/2020, Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg.
    4. Ruben Enikolopov & Maria Petrova & Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 2010. "Media and Political Persuasion: Evidence from Russia," Working Papers w0149, New Economic School (NES).
    5. Archishman Chakraborty & Parikshit Ghosh & Jaideep Roy, 2020. "Expert-Captured Democracies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 110(6), pages 1713-1751, June.
    6. Piolatto, Amedeo & Schuett, Florian, 2015. "Media competition and electoral politics," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 80-93.
    7. Marit Hinnosaar, 2015. "Gender Inequality in New Media: Evidence from Wikipedia," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 411, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    8. Archishman Chakraborty & Parikshit Ghosh, 2016. "Character Endorsements and Electoral Competition," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 277-310, May.
    9. Enikolopov, Ruben & Makarin, Alexey & Petrova, Maria, 2016. "Social Media and Protest Participation: Evidence from Russia," CEPR Discussion Papers 11254, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. John Lott & Kevin Hassett, 2014. "Is newspaper coverage of economic events politically biased?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(1), pages 65-108, July.
    11. Agustin Casas & Yarine Fawaz & Andre Trindade, 2016. "Surprise Me If You Can: The Influence Of Newspaper Endorsements In U.S. Presidential Elections," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(3), pages 1484-1498, July.
    12. Garz, Marcel & Sörensen, Jil, 2017. "Politicians under investigation: The news Media's effect on the likelihood of resignation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 82-91.
    13. Strömberg, David, 2015. "Media and Politics," CEPR Discussion Papers 10426, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Takanori Adachi & Yoichi Hizen, 2012. "Political Accountability, Electoral Control, and Media Bias," KIER Working Papers 811, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    15. Biondo, A.E. & Pluchino, A. & Rapisarda, A., 2018. "Modeling surveys effects in political competitions," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 503(C), pages 714-726.
    16. Graham Beattie & Ruben Durante & Brian Knight & Ananya Sen, 2017. "Advertising Spending and Media Bias: Evidence from News Coverage of Car Safety Recalls," NBER Working Papers 23940, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Redlicki, B., 2017. "Spreading Lies," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1747, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    18. Miloš Fišar & Tommaso Reggiani & Fabio Sabatini & Jiří Špalek, 2020. "Media Bias and Tax Compliance: Experimental Evidence," MUNI ECON Working Papers 2020-01, Masaryk University.
    19. Giovanni Facchini & Anna Maria Mayda & Riccardo Puglisi, 2017. "Illegal immigration and media exposure: evidence on individual attitudes," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-36, December.
    20. Gehlbach, Scott & Sonin, Konstantin, 2014. "Government control of the media," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 163-171.
    21. Brian Knight & Ana Tribin, 2019. "The Limits of Propaganda: Evidence from Chavez’s Venezuela," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 17(2), pages 567-605.
    22. Cingano, Federico & Pinotti, Paolo, 2016. "Trust, firm organization, and the pattern of comparative advantage," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 1-13.
    23. Riccardo Puglisi & James M. Snyder, Jr., 2011. "The Balanced U.S. Press," NBER Working Papers 17263, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Michael J. Lamla & Sarah M. Lein, 2008. "The Role of Media for Consumers' Inflation Expectation Formation," KOF Working papers 08-201, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    25. Gambaro, Marco & Puglisi, Riccardo, 2015. "What do ads buy? Daily coverage of listed companies on the Italian press," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 41-57.
    26. Câmara, Odilon & Bernhardt, Dan, 2015. "Learning about challengers," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 181-206.
    27. Yeon-Koo Che & Konrad Mierendorff, 2018. "Optimal Dynamic Allocation of Attention," Papers 1812.06967, arXiv.org.
    28. Chongwoo Choe & Paul A. Raschky, 2011. "Media, Institutions, and Government Action: Prevention vs. Palliation in the Time of Cholera," Monash Economics Working Papers 23-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    29. Fernanda Leite Lopez Leon, 2016. "Endorse or Not to Endorse: Understanding the Determinants of Newspapers’ Likelihood of Making Political Recommendations," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 63(4), pages 357-376, September.
    30. Anton Kolotilin & Tymofiy Mylovanov & Andriy Zapechelnyuk & Ming Li, 2017. "Persuasion of a Privately Informed Receiver," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 85(6), pages 1949-1964, November.
    31. Saptarshi Ghosh & Nidhi Jain & Cesar Martinelli & Jaideep Roy, 2019. "Swings, News, and Elections," Working Papers 1076, George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science.
    32. Frijters, Paul & Velamuri, Malathi, 2009. "Is the Internet Bad News? The Online News Era and the Market for High-Quality News," MPRA Paper 15723, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    33. Leonardo Bursztyn & Davide Cantoni, 2014. "A Tear in the Iron Curtain: The Impact of Western Television on Consumption Behavior," NBER Working Papers 20403, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    34. Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay & Kalyan Chatterjee & Jaideep Roy, 2015. "Manufacturing extremism: political consequences of profit-seeking media," Discussion Papers 15-14, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    35. Adena, Maja & Enikolopov, Ruben & Petrova, Maria & Santarosa, Veronica & Zhuravskaya, Ekaterina, 2015. "Radio and the rise of the Nazis in prewar Germany," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2013-310r, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    36. Beattie, Graham, 2020. "Advertising and media capture: The case of climate change," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 188(C).
    37. Jetter, Michael, 2017. "Terrorism and the Media: The Effect of US Television Coverage on Al-Qaeda Attacks," IZA Discussion Papers 10708, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    38. Oscar Barrera & Sergei Guriev & Emeric Henry & Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 2018. "Facts, Alternative Facts, and Fact Checking in Times of Post-Truth Politics," Sciences Po publications 2018-09, Sciences Po.
    39. Santiago Oliveros & Felix Várdy, 2015. "Demand for Slant: How Abstention Shapes Voters' Choice of News Media," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(587), pages 1327-1368, September.
    40. Lockwood, Ben & Rockey, James, 2015. "Negative Voters: Electoral Competition with Loss-Aversion," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1063, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    41. Stefano DellaVigna & Ruben Enikolopov & Vera Mironova & Maria Petrova & Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 2011. "Cross-border media and nationalism: Evidence from Serbian radio in Croatia," NBER Working Papers 16989, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    42. Stefano Dellavigna & Johannes Hermle, 2017. "Does Conflict of Interest Lead to Biased Coverage? Evidence from Movie Reviews," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(4), pages 1510-1550.
    43. Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon, 2010. "Endorse or Not to Endorse: Understanding the Determinants of Newspapers' Likelihood of Making Political Recommendations," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 022, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    44. Ruben Enikolopov & Maria Petrova & Konstantin Sonin, 2018. "Social Media and Corruption," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 150-174, January.
    45. Petrova, Maria & Sen, Ananya & Yildirim, Pinar, 2017. "Social Media and Political Donations: New Technology and Incumbency Advantage in the United States," CEPR Discussion Papers 11808, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    46. Kennedy, Patrick & Prat, Andrea, 2017. "Where Do People Get Their News?," CEPR Discussion Papers 12426, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    47. Jörg L. Spenkuch & David Toniatti, 2016. "Political Advertising and Election Outcomes," CESifo Working Paper Series 5780, CESifo.
    48. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro & Michael Sinkinson, 2012. "Competition and Ideological Diversity: Historical Evidence from US Newspapers," NBER Working Papers 18234, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    49. Grant D. Jacobsen, 2019. "How do different sources of policy analysis affect policy preferences? Experimental evidence from the United States," Policy Sciences, Springer;Society of Policy Sciences, vol. 52(3), pages 315-342, September.
    50. Hulya Eraslan & Saltuk Ozerturk, 2018. "Information Gatekeeping and Media Bias," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1808, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    51. Horacio A Larreguy & John Marshall & James M SnyderJr, 2018. "Leveling the playing field: How campaign advertising can help non-dominant parties," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 16(6), pages 1812-1849.
    52. Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay & Kalyan Chatterjee & Jaideep Roy, 2020. "Extremist Platforms: Political Consequences Of Profit‐Seeking Media," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 61(3), pages 1173-1193, August.
    53. Pogorelskiy. Kirill & Shum, Matthew, 2019. "News We Like to Share : How News Sharing on Social Networks Influences Voting Outcomes," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1199, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    54. Francesco Sobbrio, 2012. "A Citizen-Editors Model of News Media," RSCAS Working Papers 2012/61, European University Institute.
    55. Friebel, Guido & Heinz, Matthias, 2012. "Media slant against foreign owners: Downsizing," CEPR Discussion Papers 9192, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    56. Ho, Benjamin & Liu, Peng, 2015. "Herd journalism: Investment in novelty and popularity in markets for news," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 33-46.
    57. van Gils, Freek & Müller, Wieland & Prüfer, Jens, 2020. "Big Data and Democracy," Discussion Paper 2020-011, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    58. Chun-Fang Chiang & Semin Kim & SunTak Kim & Chien-Hsun Lin & Ming-Jen Lin, 2019. "Can Partisan News Shift Political Preference and Voting Behavior? An Experimental Evidence from Taiwan's General Elections 2016," Working papers 2019rwp-147, Yonsei University, Yonsei Economics Research Institute.
    59. Raphael Bruce & Rafael Costa Lima, 2015. "Compulsory Voting and TV News Consumption," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2015_48, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP), revised 12 Jun 2017.
    60. Francesco Sobbrio, 2014. "The political economy of news media: theory, evidence and open issues," Chapters, in: Francesco Forte & Ram Mudambi & Pietro Maria Navarra (ed.),A Handbook of Alternative Theories of Public Economics, chapter 13, pages 278-320, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    61. Qian, Nancy & Yangagizawa, David, 2010. "Watchdog or Lapdog? Media and the U.S. Government," CEPR Discussion Papers 7684, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    62. Gregory J. Martin & Ali Yurukoglu, 2014. "Bias in Cable News: Persuasion and Polarization," NBER Working Papers 20798, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    63. Horacio A. Larreguy & John Marshall & James M. Snyder, Jr., 2014. "Revealing Malfeasance: How Local Media Facilitates Electoral Sanctioning of Mayors in Mexico," NBER Working Papers 20697, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    64. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2011. "Ideological Segregation Online and Offline," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(4), pages 1799-1839.
    65. Camilo García-Jimeno & Pinar Yildirim, 2017. "Matching Pennies on the Campaign Trail: An Empirical Study of Senate Elections and Media Coverage," NBER Working Papers 23198, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    66. Carlsson, Magnus & Dahl, Gordon B. & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2016. "Do Politicians Change Public Attitudes?," IZA Discussion Papers 10349, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    67. Protte, Benjamin, 2012. "Does Fleet Street shape politics? Estimating the Effect of Newspaper Coverage about Globalization on the Support for Unemployment Insurance," Working Papers 12-19, University of Mannheim, Department of Economics.
    68. Sam Schulhofer-Wohl & Miguel Garrido, 2013. "Do Newspapers Matter? Short-Run and Long-Run Evidence From the Closure of The Cincinnati Post," Journal of Media Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 60-81, June.
    69. Brian Knight & Ana Tribin, 2019. "Opposition Media, State Censorship, and Political Accountability: Evidence from Chavez's Venezuela," NBER Working Papers 25916, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    70. Ying Fan, 2013. "Ownership Consolidation and Product Characteristics: A Study of the US Daily Newspaper Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(5), pages 1598-1628, August.
    71. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro & Michael Sinkinson, 2011. "The Effect of Newspaper Entry and Exit on Electoral Politics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 2980-3018, December.
    72. Nancy Qian & David Yanagizawa-Drott, 2010. "Government Distortion in Independently Owned Media: Evidence from U.S. Cold War News Coverage of Human Rights," NBER Working Papers 15738, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    73. Saltuk Ozerturk, 2018. "Choosing a media outlet when seeking public approval," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 3-21, January.
    74. Garz, Marcel & Sood, Gaurav & Stone, Daniel F. & Wallace, Justin, 2020. "The supply of media slant across outlets and demand for slant within outlets: Evidence from US presidential campaign news," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    75. David Yanagizawa-Drott, 2012. "Propaganda and Conflict: Theory and Evidence from the Rwandan Genocide," CID Working Papers 257, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    76. Monica Martinez-Bravo & Andreas Stegmann, 2017. "In Vaccines We Trust? The Effects of the CIA's Vaccine Ruse on Immunization in Pakistan," Working Papers wp2017_1713, CEMFI, revised Jul 2018.
    77. Carlsson, Magnus & Dahl, Gordon B. & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2018. "Backlash in Attitudes after the Election of Extreme Political Parties," IZA Discussion Papers 11759, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    78. Magnus Carlsson & Gordon B. Dahl & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2015. "Backlash in Policy Attitudes After the Election of Extreme Political Parties," NBER Working Papers 21062, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    79. Halberstam, Yosh & Knight, Brian, 2016. "Homophily, group size, and the diffusion of political information in social networks: Evidence from Twitter," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 73-88.
    80. Miner, Luke, 2015. "The unintended consequences of internet diffusion: Evidence from Malaysia," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 66-78.
    81. Nicola Mastrorocco & Luigi Minale, 2016. "Information and Crime Perceptions: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1601, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    82. Mastrorocco, Nicola & Minale, Luigi, 2018. "News media and crime perceptions: Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 230-255.
    83. Chen Lin & Jing Li & Dezhi Li, 2014. "The Power Of Visible Hands: An Environmental Structural Decomposition Analysis Considering The People'S Daily Effect," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(4), pages 431-443, December.
    84. Cagdas Agirdas, 2015. "What Drives Media Bias? New Evidence From Recent Newspaper Closures," Journal of Media Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(3), pages 123-141, September.
    85. Michael Jetter, 2017. "Mediated Terrorism: US News and Al-Qaeda Attacks," CESifo Working Paper Series 6804, CESifo.
    86. Eraslan, Hulya & Ozerturk, Saltuk, 2017. "Information Gatekeeping and Media Bias," Working Papers 17-001, Rice University, Department of Economics.
    87. Szeidl, Adam & Szucs, Ferenc, 2017. "Media Capture through Favor Exchange," CEPR Discussion Papers 11875, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    88. Maria Petrova & Ananya Sen & Pinar Yildirim, 2020. "Social Media and Political Contributions: The Impact of New Technology on Political Competition," Papers 2011.02924, arXiv.org.
    89. Halberstam, Yosh & Montagnes, B. Pablo, 2015. "Presidential coattails versus the median voter: Senator selection in US elections," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 40-51.
    90. Sobbrio, Francesco, 2014. "Citizen-editors' endogenous information acquisition and news accuracy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 43-53.
    91. Junze Sun & Arthur Schram & Randolph Sloof, 2019. "A Theory on Media Bias and Elections," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 19-048/I, Tinbergen Institute.
    92. Warren, Patrick L., 2012. "Independent auditors, bias, and political agency," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 78-88.
    93. Caroline Le Pennec & Vincent Pons, 2019. "How Do Campaigns Shape Vote Choice? Multi-Country Evidence from 62 Elections and 56 TV Debates," NBER Working Papers 26572, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    94. Chongwoo Choe & Paul A. Raschky, 2011. "Media, Democracy, and Government Action: Prevention vs. Palliation in the Time of Cholera," ISER Discussion Paper 0812, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    95. Jetter, Michael, 2019. "The inadvertent consequences of al-Qaeda news coverage," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 391-410.
    96. Pogorelskiy, Kirill & Shum, Matthew, 2019. "News We Like to Share: How News Sharing on Social Networks Influences Voting Outcomes," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 427, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    97. Ang, Desmond, 2018. "Do 40-Year-Old Facts Still Matter? Long-Run Effects of Federal Oversight under the Voting Rights Act," Working Paper Series rwp18-033, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Articles

  1. Chun-Fang Chiang & Jin-Tan Liu & Tsai-Wei Wen, 2019. "National identity under economic integration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(2), pages 351-367, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Bennett, Daniel & Chiang, Chun-Fang & Malani, Anup, 2015. "Learning during a crisis: The SARS epidemic in Taiwan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1-18.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Chun-Fang Chiang & Jin-Tan Liu & Tsai-Wei Wen, 2013. "Individual Preferences for Trade Partners in Taiwan," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 91-109, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Chun-Fang Chiang & Jason M. Kuo & Megumi Naoi & Jin-Tan Liu, 2020. "What Do Voters Learn from Foreign News? Emulation, Backlash, and Public Support for Trade Agreements," NBER Working Papers 27497, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Guan, Qing & An, Haizhong, 2017. "The exploration on the trade preferences of cooperation partners in four energy commodities’ international trade: Crude oil, coal, natural gas and photovoltaic," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 203(C), pages 154-163.

  4. Chun-Fang Chiang & Brian Knight, 2011. "Media Bias and Influence: Evidence from Newspaper Endorsements," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 78(3), pages 795-820.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (3) 2008-10-28 2018-06-11 2020-08-17
  2. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2008-10-28 2020-08-17
  3. NEP-CNA: China (2) 2018-06-11 2020-08-17
  4. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (1) 2011-04-23
  5. NEP-CUL: Cultural Economics (1) 2008-10-28
  6. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2020-08-17

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