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Ken Jackson

Personal Details

First Name:Ken
Middle Name:
Last Name:Jackson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pja196
http://www.kjackson.net
Terminal Degree:2010 Vancouver School of Economics; University of British Columbia (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(99%) Department of Economics
School of Business and Economics
Wilfrid Laurier University

Waterloo, Canada
http://www.wlu.ca/homepage.php?grp_id=491

: (519) 884-0710 ext 2056
(519) 884-0201
75 University Ave. West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5
RePEc:edi:sbwluca (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Balsillie School of International Affairs

Waterloo, Canada
http://www.balsillieschool.ca/

:

67 Erb St W, Waterloo Ontario N2L 3C5
RePEc:edi:basifca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Christopher Bidner & Ken Jackson, 2011. "Trust and Vulnerability," Discussion Papers 2012-09, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

Articles

  1. Ken Jackson, 2013. "Contract Enforceability and the Evolution of Social Capital," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(1), pages 60-77, February.
  2. Ken Jackson, 2013. "Diversity and the Distribution of Public Goods in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(3), pages 437-462, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Ken Jackson, 2013. "Contract Enforceability and the Evolution of Social Capital," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(1), pages 60-77, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Bidner & Ken Jackson, 2011. "Trust and Vulnerability," Discussion Papers 2012-09, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    2. Alessandra Cassar & Giovanna d'Adda & Pauline Grosjean, 2014. "Institutional Quality, Culture, and Norms of Cooperation: Evidence from Behavioral Field Experiments," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(3), pages 821-863.
    3. A. Alesina & P. Giuliano., 2016. "Culture and Institutions," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 11.
    4. Pierre-Guillaume Méon & Khalid Sekkat, 2013. "The formal and informal institutional framework of capital accumulation," Working Papers CEB 13-036, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Scott E. Masten & Jens Prüfer, 2014. "On the Evolution of Collective Enforcement Institutions: Communities and Courts," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(2), pages 359-400.
    6. Hernández, José & Guerrero-Luchtenberg, César, 2016. "Social capital, perceptions and economic performance," MPRA Paper 71006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Alessandra Cassar & Giovanna d'Adda & Pauline Grosjean, 2013. "Institutional Quality, Culture, and Norms of Cooperation: Evidence from a Behavioral Field Experiment," Discussion Papers 2013-10, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

  2. Ken Jackson, 2013. "Diversity and the Distribution of Public Goods in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(3), pages 437-462, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Bunte, Jonas B. & Kim, Alisha A., 2017. "Citizens’ Preferences and the Portfolio of Public Goods: Evidence from Nigeria," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 28-39.
    2. Gisselquist, Rachel M. & Leiderer, Stefan & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2014. "Ethnic heterogeneity and public goods provision in Zambia: Further evidence of a subnational .diversity dividend," WIDER Working Paper Series 162, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Gisselquist, Rachel M. & Leiderer, Stefan & Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel, 2016. "Ethnic Heterogeneity and Public Goods Provision in Zambia: Evidence of a Subnational “Diversity Dividend”," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 308-323.
    4. Prerna Singh & Dean Spears, 2017. "How status inequality between ethnic groups affects public goods provision: Experimental evidence on caste and tolerance for teacher absenteeism in India," WIDER Working Paper Series 129, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Bigsten, Arne, 2014. "Dimensions of African inequality," WIDER Working Paper Series 050, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. UNDP Regional Bureau for Africa, "undated". "Drivers of Inequality in the Context of the Growth-Poverty-Inequality Nexus in Africa: Overview of key issues," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2017-04, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

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