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Jan Brenner

Personal Details

This person is deceased (Date: unknown)
First Name:Jan
Middle Name:
Last Name:Brenner
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RePEc Short-ID:pbr186
Terminal Degree:2008 Ruhr Graduate School in Economics (from RePEc Genealogy)

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Brenner, Jan, 2009. "Life-Cycle Variations in the Association between Current and Lifetime Earnings – Evidence for German Natives and Guest Workers," Ruhr Economic Papers 95, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  2. Brenner, Jan, 2007. "Effects of Job Entry Restrictions on Economic Integration - Evidence for Recent Ethnic German Immigrants," Ruhr Economic Papers 25, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  3. Brenner, Jan, 2007. "Parental Impact on Attitude Formation - A Siblings Study on Worries about Immigration," Ruhr Economic Papers 22, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  4. Brenner, Jan & Fertig, Michael, 2006. "Identifying the Determinants of Attitudes towards Immigrants: A Structural Cross-Country Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 2306, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Articles

  1. Brenner, Jan, 2010. "Life-cycle variations in the association between current and lifetime earnings: Evidence for German natives and guest workers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 392-406, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Brenner, Jan, 2009. "Life-Cycle Variations in the Association between Current and Lifetime Earnings – Evidence for German Natives and Guest Workers," Ruhr Economic Papers 95, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

    Cited by:

    1. Rolf Aaberge & Magne Mogstad, 2015. "Inequality in current and lifetime income," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 44(2), pages 217-230, February.
    2. Brunello, Giorgio & Weber, Guglielmo & Weiss, Christoph T., 2012. "Books Are Forever: Early Life Conditions, Education and Lifetime Income," IZA Discussion Papers 6386, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J., 2010. "Recent Developments in Intergenerational Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 4866, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Flake, Regina, 2013. "Gender Differences in the Earnings Mobility of Migrants," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 58-79.
    5. Pierre Brochu & Till Gross & Christopher Worswick, 2016. "Temporary Foreign Workers and Firms: Theory and Canadian Evidence," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1628, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    6. Marco Bertoni & Giorgio Brunello, 2016. "Later-borns Don’t Give Up: The Temporary Effects of Birth Order on European Earnings," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(2), pages 449-470, April.
    7. Bönke, Timm & Corneo, Giacomo & Lüthen, Holger, 2011. "Lifetime Earnings Inequality in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 6020, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Daniel D. Schnitzlein, 2014. "A New Look at Intergenerational Mobility in Germany Compared to the US," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 689, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Daniel D. Schnitzlein, 2016. "A New Look at Intergenerational Mobility in Germany Compared to the U.S," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 62(4), pages 650-667, December.
    10. Giorgio Brunello & Guglielmo Weber & Christoph T. Weiss, 2017. "Books are Forever: Early Life Conditions, Education and Lifetime Earnings in Europe," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(600), pages 271-296, March.
    11. Manudeep Bhuller & Magne Mogstad & Kjell G.Salvanes, 2011. "Life-cycle bias and the returns to schooling in current and lifetime earnings," Discussion Papers 666, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    12. Céline Lecavelier des Etangs-Levallois, 2017. "Overview of intergenerational earnings mobility in Germany," THEMA Working Papers 2017-11, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    13. Soobin Kim, 2017. "Intergenerational mobility in Korea," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-18, December.
    14. Coban, Mustafa & Sauerhammer, Sarah, 2017. "Transmission channels of intergenerational income mobility: Empirical evidence from Germany and the Unites States," Discussion Paper Series 138, Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg, Chair of Economic Order and Social Policy.
    15. Flake, Regina, 2011. "Gender Differences in the Intergenerational Earnings Mobility of Second-Generation Migrants," Ruhr Economic Papers 283, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    16. Chau, Tak Wai, 2012. "Intergenerational income mobility revisited: Estimation with an income dynamic model with heterogeneous age profile," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 770-773.

  2. Brenner, Jan, 2007. "Effects of Job Entry Restrictions on Economic Integration - Evidence for Recent Ethnic German Immigrants," Ruhr Economic Papers 25, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

    Cited by:

    1. Schurer, Stefanie, 2008. "Labour Market Outcomes of Second Generation Immigrants: How Heterogeneous Are They Really?," Ruhr Economic Papers 57, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

  3. Brenner, Jan, 2007. "Parental Impact on Attitude Formation - A Siblings Study on Worries about Immigration," Ruhr Economic Papers 22, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

    Cited by:

    1. Schmitz, Hendrik, 2011. "Why are the unemployed in worse health? The causal effect of unemployment on health," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 71-78, January.
    2. Martina Eschelbach, 2009. "Crown Princes and Benjamins: Birth Order and Educational Attainment in East and West Germany," Working Papers 085, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    3. Michael Fertig & Christoph Schmidt, 2011. "Attitudes towards foreigners and Jews in Germany: identifying the determinants of xenophobia in a large opinion survey," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 99-128, March.

  4. Brenner, Jan & Fertig, Michael, 2006. "Identifying the Determinants of Attitudes towards Immigrants: A Structural Cross-Country Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 2306, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. R Todd Jewell & Natalia Melgar & David J. Molina & Máximo Rossi, 2009. "Attitudes toward immigrants: a cross-country perspective," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0309, Department of Economics - dECON.
    2. Tiiu Paas & Olga Demidova, 2014. "What Explains People’S Attitudes Towards Immigrants? A Comparative Study Of Estonia And Russia," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 94, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    3. Jonas Månsson & Josefin Dahlander, 2011. "Social interaction impact on attitudes – Native Swedes’ attitudes towards labour immigrants and guest workers after hurricane Gudrun," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 11(1), pages 51-64, July.
    4. Demidova, Olga, 2012. "The European residents' attitude towards immigrants: A comparative analysis based on the ESS data," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 28(4), pages 23-34.
    5. TIIU PAAS & Olga Demidova, 2013. "How people perceive immigrants' role in their country's life: a comparative study of Estonia and Russia," ERSA conference papers ersa13p569, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Aleksynska, Mariya, 2011. "Relative deprivation, relative satisfaction, and attitudes towards immigrants: Evidence from Ukraine," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 189-207, June.
    7. Brenner, Jan, 2007. "Parental Impact on Attitude Formation - A Siblings Study on Worries about Immigration," Ruhr Economic Papers 22, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    8. Michael Fertig & Christoph Schmidt, 2011. "Attitudes towards foreigners and Jews in Germany: identifying the determinants of xenophobia in a large opinion survey," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 99-128, March.
    9. Aleksynska, Mariya, 2007. "Attitudes Towards Immigrants and Relative Deprivation: The Case of a Middle-Income Country," MPRA Paper 4595, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Brenner, Jan, 2010. "Life-cycle variations in the association between current and lifetime earnings: Evidence for German natives and guest workers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 392-406, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

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NEP Fields

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  1. NEP-EEC: European Economics (1) 2006-09-23

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