IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pam140.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Francesco Ammannati

Personal Details

First Name:Francesco
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ammannati
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pam140

Affiliation

(47%) "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA)
Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi

Milano, Italy
http://www.dondena.unibocconi.it/
RePEc:edi:dobocit (more details at EDIRC)

(47%) Istituto Internazionale di Storia Economica "F. Datini"

Prato, Italy
http://www.istitutodatini.it/
RePEc:edi:datinit (more details at EDIRC)

(6%) Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa
Scuola di Economia e Management
Università degli Studi di Firenze

Firenze, Italy
http://www.disei.unifi.it/
RePEc:edi:defirit (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Francesco Ammannati, 2015. "La distribuzione della propriet√† nella Lucchesia del tardo Medioevo (sec. XIV-XV)," Working Papers 073, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  2. Guido Alfani & Francesco Ammannati, 2014. "Economic inequality and poverty in the very long run: The case of the Florentine State," Working Papers 070, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  3. Francesco Ammannati & Davide De Franco & Matteo Di Tullio, 2014. "Misurare la diseguaglianza economica nell‚Äôet√† preindustriale: un confronto fra realt√† dell‚ÄôItalia centro-settentrionale," Working Papers 065, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.

Articles

  1. Francesco Ammannati, 2019. "William Caferro, Petrarch's war: Florence and the Black Death in context (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. Pp. xii+228. 5 figs. 3 maps. 23 tabs. ISBN 9781108424011 Hbk. £75)," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(2), pages 778-779, May.
  2. Guido Alfani & Francesco Ammannati, 2017. "Long‐term trends in economic inequality: the case of the Florentine state, c. 1300–1800," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1072-1102, November.
  3. Francesco Ammannati & Davide De Franco & Matteo Di Tullio, 2015. "Measuring Economic Inequality in the Pre-industrial Era: A Comparison of Different Areas of Northern and Central Italy," Rivista di storia economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 3, pages 309-340.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography of Economics:
  1. Guido Alfani & Francesco Ammannati, 2014. "Economic inequality and poverty in the very long run: The case of the Florentine State," Working Papers 070, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Black Death

Working papers

  1. Guido Alfani & Francesco Ammannati, 2014. "Economic inequality and poverty in the very long run: The case of the Florentine State," Working Papers 070, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.

    Cited by:

    1. Wouter Ryckbosch, 2016. "Editor's choice Economic inequality and growth before the industrial revolution: the case of the Low Countries (fourteenth to nineteenth centuries)," European Review of Economic History, European Historical Economics Society, vol. 20(1), pages 1-22.
    2. Guido Alfani, 2017. "The rich in historical perspective: Evidence for preindustrial Europe, c. 1300-1800," Working Papers 17020, Economic History Society.
    3. Nikolaj Malinowski & Jan Luiten van Zanden, 2015. "National income and its distribution in preindustrial Poland in a global perspective," Working Papers 0076, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    4. Alfani, Guido & Ryckbosch, Wouter, 2016. "Growing apart in early modern Europe? A comparison of inequality trends in Italy and the Low Countries, 1500–1800," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 143-153.
    5. Guido Alfani & Wouter Ryckbosch, 2015. "Was there a ‘Little Convergence’ in inequality? Italy and the Low Countries compared, ca. 1500-1800," Working Papers 557, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    6. Mikołaj Malinowski & Jan Luiten Zanden, 2017. "Income and its distribution in preindustrial Poland," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 11(3), pages 375-404, September.
    7. van Bavel, Bas, 2016. "The Invisible Hand?: How Market Economies have Emerged and Declined Since AD 500," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199608133, Decembrie.
    8. Guido Alfani & Matteo Di Tullio, 2015. "Dinamiche di lungo periodo della disuguaglianza in Italia settentrionale: una nota di ricerca," Working Papers 071, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    9. Milanovic, Branko, 2016. "Towards an explanation of inequality in pre-modern societies:the role of colonies and high population density," MPRA Paper 74877, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  2. Francesco Ammannati & Davide De Franco & Matteo Di Tullio, 2014. "Misurare la diseguaglianza economica nell‚Äôet√† preindustriale: un confronto fra realt√† dell‚ÄôItalia centro-settentrionale," Working Papers 065, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.

    Cited by:

    1. Guido Alfani, 2017. "The rich in historical perspective: Evidence for preindustrial Europe, c. 1300-1800," Working Papers 17020, Economic History Society.
    2. Matteo Di Tullio, 2014. "Cooperating against inequality? War and commons in Renaissance Lombardy," Working Papers 069, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    3. Guido Alfani, 2014. "Economic inequality in northwestern Italy: A long-term view (fourteenth to eighteenth centuries)," Working Papers 061, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    4. Guido Alfani & Matteo Di Tullio, 2015. "Dinamiche di lungo periodo della disuguaglianza in Italia settentrionale: una nota di ricerca," Working Papers 071, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.

Articles

  1. Guido Alfani & Francesco Ammannati, 2017. "Long‐term trends in economic inequality: the case of the Florentine state, c. 1300–1800," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1072-1102, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Branko Milanovic, 2018. "Towards an explanation of inequality in premodern societies: the role of colonies, urbanization, and high population density," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(4), pages 1029-1047, November.
    2. Prados de la Escosura, Leandro & Santiago Caballero, Carlos & Álvarez Nogal, Carlos, 2020. "Economic effects of the Black Death: Spain in European perspective," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH 30466, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    3. Edoardo Demo & Roberto Ricciuti & Mattia Viale, 2018. "Decomposing Economic Inequality in Early Modern Venice (ca. 1650-1800)," HHB Working Papers Series 12, The Historical Household Budgets Project.
    4. Alfani, Guido & Di Tullio, M & Fochesato, M, 2020. "The determinants of wealth inequality in the Republic of Venice (1400-1800)," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 483, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    5. Paolo Malanima, 2018. "Italy in the Renaissance: a leading economy in the European context, 1350–1550," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(1), pages 3-30, February.
    6. Joerg Baten & Giacomo Benati & Anna Kjellström, 2021. "Violence in the Viking World: New Bioarchaeological Evidence," Working Papers 0206, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    7. Alfani, Guido & Tadei, Federico, 2017. "Income Inequality In Colonial Africa: Building Social Tables For Pre-Independence Central African Republic, Ivory Coast And Senegal," African Economic History Working Paper 33/2017, African Economic History Network.
    8. Julio Martinez-Galarraga & Marc Prat, 2022. "Pre-industrial inequality in Catalonia," UB School of Economics Working Papers 2022/430, University of Barcelona School of Economics.
    9. Guido Alfani & Marco Percoco, 2016. "Plague and long-term development: the lasting effects of the 1629-30 epidemic on the Italian cities," Working Papers 0106, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    10. Alfani, Guido, 2020. "Epidemics, inequality and poverty in preindustrial and early industrial times," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 520, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    11. Mattia Fochesato, 2021. "Plagues, wars, political change, and fiscal capacity: late medieval and Renaissance Siena, 1337–1556," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 74(4), pages 1031-1061, November.
    12. Adelaide Baronchelli & Roberto Ricciuti & Mattia Viale, 2023. "Elite persistence in medieval Venice after the Black Death," Working Papers 01/2023, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    13. Kumon, Yuzuru, 2021. "The Deep Roots of Inequality," IAST Working Papers 21-125, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST).
    14. Alfani, Guido, 2023. "Inequality in History: A Long-Run View," SocArXiv 94dgs, Center for Open Science.
    15. Rota, Mauro & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2019. "Expensive Labour and the Industrial Revolution: Evidence from Stable Employment in Rural Areas," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 442, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    16. Stefania Galli & Klas Rönnbäck, 2021. "Land distribution and inequality in a black settler colony: the case of Sierra Leone, 1792–1831," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 74(1), pages 115-137, February.
    17. Kumon, Yuzuru, 2022. "How Landownership Equality Created a Low Wage Society: Pre-industrial Japan, 1600-1870," IAST Working Papers 22-138, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST).
    18. Fochesato, Mattia, 2018. "Origins of Europe’s north-south divide: Population changes, real wages and the ‘little divergence’ in early modern Europe," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 91-131.
    19. Jaime Reis, 2017. "Deviant behaviour? Inequality in Portugal 1565–1770," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 11(3), pages 297-319, September.
    20. Mauro Rota & Jacob Weisdorf, 2021. "Italy and the little divergence in wages and prices: evidence from stable employment in rural areas," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 74(2), pages 449-470, May.
    21. Bas Bavel & Marten Scheffer, 2021. "Historical effects of shocks on inequality: the great leveler revisited," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 8(1), pages 1-9, December.
    22. Iacopetta, Maurizio, 2021. "Class differences and the Commercial Revolution: An equilibrium selection story," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 100(C).
    23. Espín-Sánchez, José-Antonio & Gil-Guirado, Salvador & Giraldo-Paez, W. Daniel & Vickers, Chris, 2019. "Labor income inequality in pre-industrial Mediterranean Spain: The city of Murcia in the 18th century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 1-1.
    24. Schaff, Felix, 2020. "When ‘the state made war’, what happened to economic inequality? Evidence from preindustrial Germany (c.1400-1800)," Economic History Working Papers 107046, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    25. Erik Bengtsson & Mats Olsson & Patrick Svensson, 2022. "Mercantilist inequality: wealth and poverty in Stockholm, 1650–1750†," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 75(1), pages 157-180, February.
    26. Kumon, Yuzuru, 2021. "Wealth Inequality in Pre-industrial Rural England," IAST Working Papers 21-124, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST).
    27. Erik, Bengtsson & Olsson, Mats & Svensson, Patrick, 2019. "Mercantilist Inequality: Wealth and Poverty in Stockholm 1650-1750," Lund Papers in Economic History 210, Lund University, Department of Economic History.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic and Financial History (2) 2015-02-16 2015-04-19
  2. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2015-02-16

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Francesco Ammannati should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.