IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/b/upj/ubooks/iik.html
   My bibliography  Save this book

Investing in Kids: Early Childhood Programs and Local Economic Development

Author

Listed:
  • Timothy J. Bartik

    (W.E. Upjohn Institute)

Abstract

Early childhood programs, if designed correctly, pay big economic dividends down the road because they increase the skills of their participants. And since many of those participants will remain in the same state or local area as adults, the local economy benefits: more persons with better skills attract business, which provides more and better jobs for the local economy. Bartik measures ratios of local economic development benefits to costs for both early childhood education and business incentives. He shows that early childhood programs and the best-designed business incentives can provide local benefits that significantly exceed costs. Given this, states and municipalities would do well to adopt economic development strategies that balance high-quality business incentives with early childhood programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy J. Bartik, 2011. "Investing in Kids: Early Childhood Programs and Local Economic Development," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number iik, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:iik
    Note: PDF is the book's first chapter.
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://research.upjohn.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1771&context=up_bookchapters
    Download Restriction: All books are copyrighted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Hong & Zhao, Zhong, 2014. "Parental job loss and children's health: Ten years after the massive layoff of the SOEs' workers in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 303-319.
    2. Mark D. Partridge & M. Rose Olfert, 2011. "The Winners' Choice: Sustainable Economic Strategies for Successful 21st-Century Regions," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 33(2), pages 143-178.
    3. Greg J. Duncan & Aaron J. Sojourner, 2013. "Can Intensive Early Childhood Intervention Programs Eliminate Income-Based Cognitive and Achievement Gaps?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(4), pages 945-968.
    4. Timothy J. Bartik, 2014. "From Preschool to Prosperity: The Economic Payoff to Early Childhood Education," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number fptp, November.
    5. Francesca Froy, 2013. "Global policy developments towards industrial policy and skills: skills for competitiveness and growth," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(2), pages 344-360, SUMMER.
    6. Timothy J. Bartik & JOnathan A. Belford & William T. Gormley & Sara Anderson, 2016. "A Benefit-Cost Analysis of the Tulsa Universal Pre-K Program," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 16-261, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    7. Michelle Miller-Adams & Bridget Timmeney, 2013. "The Impact of the Kalamazoo Promise on College Choice: An Analysis of Kalamazoo Area Math and Science Center Graduates," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 2013-014, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    EDUCATION and TRAINING; Early childhood; Preschool and early education; REGIONAL ISSUES; Business incentives;

    JEL classification:

    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:iik. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/upjohus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.