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The Origins of Active Social Policy: Labour Market and Childcare Policies in a Comparative Perspective

Author

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  • Bonoli, Giuliano

    (Professor of Social Policy, Swiss Graduate School of Public Administration (IDHEAP))

Abstract

Since the mid-1990s European welfare states have undergone a major transformation. Relative to the post-war years, today they put less emphasis on income protection and more on the promotion of labour market participation. This book investigates this transformation by focusing on two fields of social policy: active labour market policy and childcare. Throughout Europe, governments have invested massively in these two areas. The result, a more active welfare state, seems a rather solid achievement, likely to survive the turbulent post-crisis years. Why? Case studies of policy trajectories in seven European countries and advanced statistical analysis of spending figures suggest that the shift towards an active social policy is only in part a response to a changed economic environment. Political competition, and particularly the extent to which active social policy can be used for credit claiming purposes, help us understand the peculiar cross-national pattern of social policy reorientation. This book, by trying to understand the shift towards an active welfare state, provides also an update of political science theories of social policy making.

Suggested Citation

  • Bonoli, Giuliano, 2013. "The Origins of Active Social Policy: Labour Market and Childcare Policies in a Comparative Perspective," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199669769.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780199669769
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    Cited by:

    1. Marion Ellison & Vittorio Sergi & Nicola Giannelli, 2017. "An In-Depth Analysis of the Relationship Between Policy Making Processes, Forms of Governance and the Impact of selected Labour Market Innovations in twelve European Labour Market Settings," Working Papers 1701, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Department of Economics, Society & Politics - Scientific Committee - L. Stefanini & G. Travaglini, revised 2017.
    2. Wim Van Lancker & Joris Ghysels, 2013. "Great expectations, but how to achieve them? Explaining patterns of inequality in childcare use across 31 developed countries," Working Papers 1305, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    3. Karin Heitzmann & Florian Wukovitsch, 2015. "Towards social investment and social innovation in EU member states? First observations of recent developments in Austria," ImPRovE Working Papers 15/19, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    4. Obinger, Herbert & Starke, Peter, 2014. "Welfare state transformation: Convergence and the rise of the supply side model," TranState Working Papers 180, University of Bremen, Collaborative Research Center 597: Transformations of the State.

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