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Macroeconomic Theory


  • Benassy, Jean-Pascal

    (National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS))


This graduate textbook is a "primer" in macroeconomics. It starts with essential undergraduate macroeconomics and develops in a simple and rigorous manner the central topics of modern macroeconomic theory including rational expectations, growth, business cycles, money, unemployment, government policy, and the macroeconomics of nonclearing markets. The emphasis throughout the book is on both foundations and presenting the simplest model for each topic that will deliver the relevant answers. The first two chapters recall the main workhorses of undergraduate macroeconomics: the Solow-Swan growth model, the Keynesian IS-LM model, and the Phillips curve. The next chapters present four fundamental "building blocks" of modern macroeconomics: rational expectations, intertemporal dynamic models, nonclearing markets and imperfect competition, and uncertainty. Later the book deals with growth, notably the Ramsey model, overlapping generations, and endogenous growth. Chapter 10 moves to the famous "real business cycles" (RBC), which integrate in a unified framework growth and fluctuations. The final chapters look at the issue of stabilization, how best to guard the economy from shocks, and the connections between politics and the macroeconomy. To make the book self contained, a mathematical appendix gives a number of simple technical results that are sufficient to follow the formal developments of the book. Available in OSO:

Suggested Citation

  • Benassy, Jean-Pascal, 2011. "Macroeconomic Theory," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195387711.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780195387711

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gordon,Robert J., 2004. "Productivity Growth, Inflation, and Unemployment," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521531429, March.
    2. Dale W. Jorgenson, 2001. "Information Technology and the U.S. Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 1-32, March.
    3. Gordon,Robert J., 2004. "Productivity Growth, Inflation, and Unemployment," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521800082, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lee Endress & James Roumasset & Christopher Wada, 2016. "Do Natural Disasters Make Sustainable Growth Impossible?," Working Papers 2016-12, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
    2. Barbara Annicchiarico & Alessandra Pelloni, 2014. "Productivity growth and volatility: how important are wage and price rigidities?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(1), pages 306-324, January.
    3. Tetsuo Ono, 2014. "Growth, Unemployment, and Fiscal Policy: A Political Economy Analysis," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 14-30-Rev., Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Sep 2015.
    4. Dag Kolsrud & Ragnar Nymoen, 2014. "Macroeconomic Stability or Cycles? The Role of the Wage-Price Spiral," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1-2), pages 41-68, June.
    5. João Ricardo Faria & Peter Mcadam, 2013. "Anticipation of Future Consumption: A Monetary Perspective," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(2-3), pages 423-447, March.
    6. Benjamin Eden, 2011. "Intergenerational Intermediation and Altruistic Preferences," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 1108, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    7. Celso Jose Costa Junior, 2016. "Understanding DSGE models," Vernon Press Titles in Economics, Vernon Art and Science Inc, edition 1, number 70.

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