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Competition and Control at Work: A New Industrial Sociology

Author

Listed:
  • Stephen Hill

    () (London School of Economics)

Abstract

"The central problem facing modern business is the impossibility of abolishing the conditions which create conflicts in the workplace without destroying the present form of the economy." This is the author's controversial conclusion to a wide-ranging study that draws on historical and comparative studies of labor and managerial organization, modern theoretical and empirical accounts of class structure and the role of the state in the economy, the economic literature dealing with trade unions, labor markets, and certain aspects of economic theory. Taking the underlying competition of interests between worker and employer as his starting point, Hill documents the evolution of new forms of managerial organization designed to enhance and legitimate the employer's control over the worker. A central theme is the precarious nature of the industrial peace given the ineradicable opposition of interests which characterizes most modern forms of economic organizations. The major part of the book places discussions of empirical material, particularly new evidence on European industry and comparative material on the United States and Japan, within a coherent theoretical framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Hill, 1981. "Competition and Control at Work: A New Industrial Sociology," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262580535, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262580535
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Benson, 1994. "The Economic Effects of Unionism on Japanese Manufacturing Enterprises," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 32(1), pages 1-21, March.
    2. Stephen Dunn & Martyn Wright, 1994. "Maintaining the ‘Status Quo’? An Analysis of the Contents of British Collective Agreements, 1979–1990," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 32(1), pages 23-46, March.
    3. Martin M. Perline & David J. Poynter, 1990. "Union and Management Perceptions of Managerial Prerogatives: Some Insight into the Future of Co-operative Bargaining in the USA," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 179-196, July.
    4. Williams, Robin & Edge, David, 1996. "The social shaping of technology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 865-899, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    manegerial organization; industrial sociology;

    JEL classification:

    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General
    • L22 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Organization and Market Structure
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation

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