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Maghreb Regional and Global Integration: A Dream to be Fulfilled


  • Gary Clyde Hufbauer

    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

  • Claire Brunel

    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)


Increasing terrorist activity has led the Maghreb countries--Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Mauritania, and Libya--to focus on antiterrorism efforts, unintentionally at the expense of full-fledged economic reform. These countries have tightened their border restrictions on the flow of people and goods, reducing commerce and depressing economic activity. In fact, Maghreb has one of the lowest rates of intra-regional trade in the world; other factors like rigid economic structures, slow productivity growth, and modest investment levels continue to stymie progress toward economic integration. * Do these countries' diverse circumstances symbolize insurmountable obstacles in achieving economic cooperation and an improved standard of living for citizens? How can the United States and European Union facilitate economic progress? Maghreb Regional and Global Integration: A Dream to Be Fulfilled utilizes two distinct econometric tools to assess four key sectors--energy, banking and insurance, transport, and agribusiness--and outlines achievable sector-specific recommendations. This book not only assesses the gains from economic integration among the Maghreb countries, but also focuses on the tangible benefits from enhanced economic ties between the region and the world economy. With this critical analysis, the authors provide an in-depth look at practical measures such as bilateral trade and investment agreements, regional arrangements, and financial assistance that can significantly boost short-term success and ensure long-term gains through integration in an unstable region.

Suggested Citation

  • Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Claire Brunel, 2008. "Maghreb Regional and Global Integration: A Dream to be Fulfilled," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number pa86.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:ppress:pa86
    Note: Policy Analyses in International Economics 86

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2011. "From Financial Crash to Debt Crisis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1676-1706, August.
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    1. repec:spr:endesu:v:19:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10668-016-9820-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hoekman, Bernard & Sekkat, Khalid, 2010. "Arab Economic Integration: Missing links," CEPR Discussion Papers 7807, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Shahid Yusuf, 2014. "Middle East Transitions; A Long, Hard Road," IMF Working Papers 14/135, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Thorvaldur Gylfason & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso & Per Magnus Wijkman, 2012. "How Free Trade Can Help Convert the 'Arab Spring' into Permanent Peace and Democracy," CESifo Working Paper Series 3882, CESifo Group Munich.

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