IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book or follow this series

Investments in Painting: The interaction of monetary return and psychic income

  • Morten Balling
    ()

Registered editor(s):

The financial press gives very regular attention to art and culture in their many forms. Business newspapers such as the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, Het Financieele Dagblad and De Financieel Economische Tijd give over plenty of space in their weekend editions to news of art auction prices and exhibitions of major or less well-known works. As well as this practical outlook, more theoretical economists have given increasing attention to the economics of art since the 1970s. There has been a remarkably large amount of research into the pricing of art and the closely associated subject of the return on purchases of art. This centres on painting in general and on individual painters. The attention to painting in the business press is without doubt prompted by the need for journalistic variety, plus the wish to impart a cultural element to the reporting. The provision of market information to readers is, of course, another significant motive. It is less simple to explain the academic interest of economists. At first sight, it seems exotic. But that is a hasty conclusion. Along with intellectual curiosity, there is probably a role for the need to apply trusted analytical methods to new areas of research. Whatever the reason, there is a place for the systematic study of the literature on the sense and nonsense of investing in painting and this is the objective of this paper. It is, however, also a report of explorations in a field that has fascinated me personally as an economist for many years.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.suerf.org/download/studies/study13.pdf
File Function: Main Text
Download Restriction: no

as
in new window

This book is provided by SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum in its series SUERF Studies with number 13 and published in 2001.
ISBN: 978-3-902109-05-7
Handle: RePEc:erf:erfstu:13
Contact details of provider: Postal: SUERF c/o OeNB, Otto-Wagner-Platz 3, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Phone: +43/1/404 20 7216
Fax: +43/1/404 20 7298
Web page: http://www.suerf.org
Email:


More information through EDIRC

Order Information: Postal: SUERF c/o OeNB, Otto-Wagner-Platz 3, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Email:


References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Cem Karacadag & Michael W. Taylor, 2000. "The New Capital Adequacy Framework - Institutional Constraints and Incentive Structures," SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum, number 8 edited by Morten Balling, May.
  2. Throsby, David, 1994. "The Production and Consumption of the Arts: A View of Cultural Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 1-29, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:erf:erfstu:13. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dragana Popovic)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.