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Climate Change Economics

Author

Listed:
  • G. C. van Kooten

Abstract

Although the full extent of the potential damages from global warming remain unknown, scientists have long argued that action should be taken now to mitigate any possible adverse consequences. However, in making such policy recommendations, economic arguments need to be considered as much as scientific ones. This volume examines the appropriate economic incentives for implementing policy to mitigate climate change and then exposes the flaws in current international agreements.

Suggested Citation

  • G. C. van Kooten, 2004. "Climate Change Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3424.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:3424
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    File URL: http://www.e-elgar.com/shop/isbn/9781843768128
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhao, Xingshu & Michaelowa, Axel, 2004. "CDM Potential for Rural Transition in China Case Study: Options in Yinzhou District, Zhejiang Province," HWWA Discussion Papers 291, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    2. Richard S J Tol, 2018. "The Economic Impacts of Climate Change," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 12(1), pages 4-25.
    3. Nijnik, Maria & Pajot, Guillaume & Moffat, Andy J. & Slee, Bill, 2013. "An economic analysis of the establishment of forest plantations in the United Kingdom to mitigate climatic change," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 34-42.
    4. van Kooten, G. Cornelis, 2004. "Economics of Forest and Agricultural Carbon Sinks," Working Papers 18160, University of Victoria, Resource Economics and Policy.
    5. van Kooten, G. Cornelis & Sohngen, Brent, 2007. "Economics of Forest Ecosystem Carbon Sinks: A Review," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 1(3), pages 237-269, September.
    6. Richard S.J. Tol, 2011. "The Social Cost of Carbon," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 3(1), pages 419-443, October.
    7. Richard S. J. Tol, 2009. "The Economic Effects of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(2), pages 29-51, Spring.
    8. Benitez, Pablo C. & van Kooten, G. Cornelis, 2005. "Carbon Sinks and Reservoirs: The Value of Permanence and Role of Discounting," Working Papers 37018, University of Victoria, Resource Economics and Policy.
    9. Belgodere, Antoine, 2010. "Climate change: discount or not? future generations don't care that much," MPRA Paper 27358, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics and Finance; Environment;

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics

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