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Fertility, Education, Growth, and Sustainability

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  • de la Croix,David

Abstract

Fertility choices depend not only on the surrounding culture but also on economic incentives, which have important consequences for inequality, education and sustainability. This book outlines parallels between demographic development and economic outcomes, explaining how fertility, growth and inequality are related. It provides a set of general equilibrium models where households choose their number of children, analysed in four domains. First, inequality is particularly damaging for growth as human capital is kept low by the mass of grown-up children stemming from poor families. Second, the cost of education can be an important determining factor on fertility. Third, fertility is sometimes viewed as a strategic variable in the power struggle between different cultural, ethnic and religious groups. Finally, fertility might be affected by policies targeted at other objectives. Incorporating new findings with the discussion of education policy and sustainability, this book is a significant addition to the literature on growth.

Suggested Citation

  • de la Croix,David, 2012. "Fertility, Education, Growth, and Sustainability," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107029590, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9781107029590
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    Cited by:

    1. David de la Croix & Eric B. Schneider & Jacob Weisdorf, 2017. ""Decessit sine prole" Childlessness, Celibacy, and Survival of the Richest in Pre-Industrial England," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2017001, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    2. David de la CROIX, 2014. "Economic Growth," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2014019, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    3. Cordoba, Juan C. & Liu, Xiying, 2016. "Malthusian Stagnation is Efficient," ISU General Staff Papers 201611270800001010, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Sandra Brée & David de la Croix, 2016. "Key Forces Behind the Decline of Fertility: Lessons from Childlessness in Rouen before the Industrial Revolution," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016014, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    5. Liu, Xiying, 2015. "Optimal population and policy implications," ISU General Staff Papers 201501010800005546, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Thomas BAUDIN & David de la CROIX & Paula GOBBI, 2015. "Development Policies when Accounting for the Extensive Margin of Fertility," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2015003, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

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