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Wage Inequalities in East and West

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  • Redor,Dominique

Abstract

This 1994 book analyses wage hierarchy in market and planning theory, and how these theories can be used as a basis for the comparison of wage structures in Western and Soviet-type systems. The author analyses statistical data from ten countries in both systems at the beginning of the eighties, and attempts to account for wage dispersion by examining such factors as education and training, discrimination against women, and market structure, as well as the influence of systemic factors. Professor Redor asserts that systemic differences are not the most significant determinants of wage inequality (the Soviet Union is found to have been on a par with the United Kingdom for example), and argues that similarities between the two systems in the dispersion of wages are due to similar patterns of work organisation and wage policies within firms, and that many determinants of wage inequality are in fact common to both systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Redor,Dominique, 1992. "Wage Inequalities in East and West," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521395311.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521395311
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    Cited by:

    1. Flemming, J.S. & Micklewright, John, 2000. "Income distribution, economic systems and transition," Handbook of Income Distribution,in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 14, pages 843-918 Elsevier.
    2. Mark Gradstein & Branko Milanovic, 2004. "Does Libertè = Egalité? A Survey of the Empirical Links between Democracy and Inequality with Some Evidence on the Transition Economies," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(4), pages 515-537, September.
    3. Elizabeth Brainerd, 2000. "Women in Transition: Changes in Gender Wage Differentials in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(1), pages 138-162, October.
    4. Puhani, Patrick A., 1997. "All Quiet on the Wage Front? Gender, Public-Private Sector Issues, and Rigidities in the Polish Wage Structure," ZEW Discussion Papers 97-03, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    5. Mark Gradstein & Branko Milanovic, 2000. "Does Liberté = Egalité? A Survey of the Empirical Evidence on the Links between Political Democracy and Income Inequality," CESifo Working Paper Series 261, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Delteil, Violaine & Pailhe, Ariane & Redor, Dominique, 2004. "Comparing individual wage determinants in Western and Central Europe: on the way to convergence? The cases of France and Hungary," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 482-499, September.
    7. Katz, Katarina, 1999. "Were there no returns to education in the USSR? Estimates from Soviet-period household data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 417-434, September.
    8. Jan Rutkowski, 1996. "High skills pay off: the changing wage structure during economic transition in Poland," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 4(1), pages 89-112, May.

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