IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/sustdv/v18y2010i3p119-122.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Unstable identities: stable unsustainability

Author

Listed:
  • Lars Strannegård

    (Department of Management and Organization, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Peter Dobers

    (School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden)

Abstract

The identity concept has emerged as a key analytical concept in the social sciences in the past decades. In both scientific accounts and everyday use, the identity concept has traditionally been seen as something that individuals possess. This view has however been heavily criticized by a social identity strand of social science, where identity is a matter of a negotiation where different social roles are learned in relations with others. The relational view of identities creates some serious problems for the sustainability challenge. In a world of relational identities, individuals are engaged in identity-creating interactions every day. Key problems are that the interactions, in urban environments, are highly commercialized; consumption cues are emotionally based and speak to our senses, and outnumber the competing cues several times over. Sustainable lifestyles are thus very fragile. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

Suggested Citation

  • Lars Strannegård & Peter Dobers, 2010. "Unstable identities: stable unsustainability," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 119-122.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:sustdv:v:18:y:2010:i:3:p:119-122
    DOI: 10.1002/sd.459
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/sd.459
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Victoria Hurth, 2010. "Creating sustainable identities: the significance of the financially affluent self," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 123-134.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bina, Olivia & Vaz, Sofia Guedes, 2011. "Humans, environment and economies: From vicious relationships to virtuous responsibility," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 170-178.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:sustdv:v:18:y:2010:i:3:p:119-122. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1099-1719 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.