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TFP growth and resource allocation in Singapore, 1965-2002

  • K. Ali Akkemik

    (Graduate School of International Development, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan)

This paper investigates the impact of the reallocations of resources across manufacturing industries on aggregate manufacturing TFP growth in Singapore for the period 1965-2002. This is done by decomposing aggregate TFP growth into its sources, TFP growth arising from within individual industries and from the reallocations of capital and labour. The results show that TFP growth was negative before 1985 but improved remarkably to positive figures after 1985. Resource reallocations are found to account for a large portion of this improvement in aggregate TFP growth. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1377
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

Volume (Year): 19 (2007)
Issue (Month): 8 ()
Pages: 1059-1073

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:19:y:2007:i:8:p:1059-1073
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  1. Jesus Felipe, 1999. "Total factor productivity growth in East Asia: A critical survey," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 1-41.
  2. Christensen, Laurits R & Jorgenson, Dale W & Lau, Lawrence J, 1973. "Transcendental Logarithmic Production Frontiers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 55(1), pages 28-45, February.
  3. Robert J. Hodrick & Edward Prescott, 1981. "Post-War U.S. Business Cycles: An Empirical Investigation," Discussion Papers 451, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  4. Alwyn Young, 1992. "A Tale of Two Cities: Factor Accumulation and Technical Change in Hong Kong and Singapore," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1992, Volume 7, pages 13-64 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Benton F. Massell, 1961. "A Disaggregated View of Technical Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 69, pages 547.
  6. Timmer, Marcel P. & Szirmai, Adam, 2000. "Productivity growth in Asian manufacturing: the structural bonus hypothesis examined," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 371-392, December.
  7. Kenneth Bercuson, 1995. "Singapore: a Case Study in Rapid Development," IMF Occasional Papers 119, International Monetary Fund.
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