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Structural change, expanding informality and labour productivity growth in Russia

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  • Voskoboynikov, Ilya B.

Abstract

Intensive growth, structural change and expanding informality has characterized many developing and emerging economies in recent decades. Yet most empirical investigations into the relationship between structural change and productivity growth overlook informality. This paper includes the informal sector in an analysis of the effects of structural changes in the Russian economy on aggre-gate labour productivity growth. Using a newly developed dataset for 34 industries covering the period 1995–2012 and applying three alternative approaches, aggregate labour productivity growth is decomposed into intra-industry and inter-industry contributions. All three approaches show that the overall contribution of structural change is growth-enhancing, significant and attenuating over time. Labour reallocation from the formal sector to the informal sector tends to reduce growth through the extension of informal activities with low productivity levels. Sectoral labour reallocation effects are found to be highly sensitive to the methods applied.

Suggested Citation

  • Voskoboynikov, Ilya B., 2017. "Structural change, expanding informality and labour productivity growth in Russia," BOFIT Discussion Papers 18/2017, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  • Handle: RePEc:bof:bofitp:2017_018
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrei V. Belyi & Peter Havlik & Artem Kochnev & Ilya B. Voskoboynikov, 2019. "Monthly Report No. 2/2019," wiiw Monthly Reports 2019-02, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    2. Voskoboynikov, Ilya B., 2017. "Structural change, expanding informality and labour productivity growth in Russia," BOFIT Discussion Papers 18/2017, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • C82 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Macroeconomic Data; Data Access
    • N14 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: 1913-

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