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Using the person trade-off approach to examine differences between individual and social values

Author

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  • Paul Dolan

    (Department of Economics, University of Newcastle, UK)

  • Colin Green

    (School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield, UK)

Abstract

Health state valuations, elicited by methods such as the standard gamble and the time trade-off, give an indication of the value that an individual attaches to particular health states. As measures of individual values, it has been argued that such valuations serve as poor proxies for social preferences, which, it is suggested, are a function of other factors, such as the initial severity of the patient's health state. The person trade-off (PTO) method has been proposed as a technique which takes account of many of these other factors. This paper reports on a study using the PTO to investigate whether an individual's preferences over treatments for themselves differ from their preferences when they are asked to think about the treatment of other people. The results suggest that there is indeed a difference, although qualitative data suggests that health gain is an important determinant of social value. This latter finding runs counter to those of a number of other studies which suggest that concerns about pre-treatment severity are as, if not more, important. Possible explanations for the differences are put forward. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Dolan & Colin Green, 1998. "Using the person trade-off approach to examine differences between individual and social values," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(4), pages 307-312.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:7:y:1998:i:4:p:307-312
    DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1050(199806)7:4<307::AID-HEC345>3.0.CO;2-N
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Dolan & Rebecca Shaw & Aki Tsuchiya & Alan Williams, 2005. "QALY maximisation and people's preferences: a methodological review of the literature," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(2), pages 197-208.
    2. repec:eee:hepoli:v:121:y:2017:i:8:p:913-922 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Lars Østerdal, 2009. "The lack of theoretical support for using person trade-offs in QALY-type models," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 10(4), pages 429-436, October.
    4. Aki Tsuchiya, 2012. "Distributional Judgements in the Context of Economic Evaluation," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 38 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Edward C. Mansley & Elamin H. Elbasha, 2003. "Preferences and person trade-offs: forcing consistency or inconsistency in health-related quality of life measures?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 187-198.
    6. Nord, Erik & Johansen, Rune, 2014. "Concerns for severity in priority setting in health care: A review of trade-off data in preference studies and implications for societal willingness to pay for a QALY," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 116(2), pages 281-288.
    7. Rachel Baker & Angela Robinson, 2004. "Responses to standard gambles: are preferences 'well constructed'?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(1), pages 37-48.
    8. Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte, 2004. "Investigating the social value of health changes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1101-1116, November.
    9. Jeff Richardson & John McKie & Stuart Peacock & Angelo Iezzi, 2011. "Severity as an independent determinant of the social value of a health service," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 12(2), pages 163-174, April.
    10. Anne Spencer, 2003. "The TTO method and procedural invariance," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(8), pages 655-668.
    11. Paul Dolan & Aki Tsuchiya, 2003. "The person trade-off method and the transitivity principle: an example from preferences over age weighting," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(6), pages 505-510.
    12. Erik Nord & Rune Johansen, 2015. "Transforming EQ-5D utilities for use in cost–value analysis of health programs," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(3), pages 313-328, April.
    13. Nord, Erik, 2013. "Disability weights in the Global Burden of Disease 2010: Unclear meaning and overstatement of international agreement," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 99-104.
    14. Doctor, Jason N. & Miyamoto, John & Bleichrodt, Han, 2009. "When are person tradeoffs valid?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 1018-1027, September.
    15. Shah, Koonal K., 2009. "Severity of illness and priority setting in healthcare: A review of the literature," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 93(2-3), pages 77-84, December.
    16. Colin Green, 2001. "On the societal value of health care: what do we know about the person trade-off technique?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(3), pages 233-243.

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