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Cross-Media Pollution: Responses to Restrictions on Chlorinated Solvent Releases

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  • Hilary Sigman

Abstract

Pollution control in one environmental medium may alter polluters' releases into other media. This paper examines cross-media responses to public policies that restrict toxic air emissions and that increase waste management costs. The EPA's 1987-90 Toxic Release Inventories are used to study the policies' effects on air emissions and waste generation of chlorinated solvents. The results suggest that constraints on air emissions reduce waste generation, perhaps because facilities rely less on these chemicals. Increases in hazardous waste management costs increase air emissions, however, suggesting that facilities substitute between releases into different environmental media.

Suggested Citation

  • Hilary Sigman, 1996. "Cross-Media Pollution: Responses to Restrictions on Chlorinated Solvent Releases," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 72(3), pages 298-312.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:72:y:1996:i:3:p:298-312
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    Cited by:

    1. Arik Levinson, 2011. "Belts and Suspenders: Interactions among Climate Policy Regulations," NBER Chapters,in: The Design and Implementation of U.S. Climate Policy, pages 127-140 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Khanna, Madhu & Damon, Lisa A., 1999. "EPA's Voluntary 33/50 Program: Impact on Toxic Releases and Economic Performance of Firms," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-25, January.
    3. Anna Alberini & Kathleen Segerson, 2002. "Assessing Voluntary Programs to Improve Environmental Quality," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 22(1), pages 157-184, June.
    4. Don Fullerton & Daniel H. Karney, 2014. "Multiple Pollutants, Uncovered Sectors, and Suboptimal Environmental Policies," NBER Working Papers 20334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Alberini, Anna & Austin, David H., 1999. "Strict Liability as a Deterrent in Toxic Waste Management: Empirical Evidence from Accident and Spill Data," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 20-48, July.
    6. Lirong Liu, 2012. "Analysis of Firm Compliance with Multiple Environmental Regulations," Working Papers 1207, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business.
    7. repec:kap:regeco:v:51:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11149-016-9314-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Matthew Gibson, 2016. "Regulation-Induced Pollution Substitution," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-04, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    9. Lirong Liu, 2013. "Analysis of Firm Compliance with Multiple Environmental regulations," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1695-1705.
    10. repec:eee:jeeman:v:87:y:2018:i:c:p:52-71 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Christopher Hansman & Jonas Hjort & Gianmarco León, 2015. "Firm's response and unintended health consequences of industrial regulations," Economics Working Papers 1469, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    12. Antoniou, Fabio & Kyriakopoulou, Efthymia, 2015. "On The Strategic Effect of International Permits Trading on Local Pollution: The Case of Multiple Pollutants," Working Papers in Economics 610, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    13. Gibson, Matthew, 2014. "Dirty and perverse: regulation-induced pollution substitution," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt6tn7t0wv, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.

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