IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ucp/jpolec/v84y1976i2p299-316.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

A Model of Optimal Human-Capital Accumulation and the Wages of Young High School Graduates

Author

Listed:
  • Brown, Charles

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Brown, Charles, 1976. "A Model of Optimal Human-Capital Accumulation and the Wages of Young High School Graduates," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(2), pages 299-316, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:84:y:1976:i:2:p:299-316
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/260433
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers. See http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE for details.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mohsen BOUAISSA, "undated". "Human Capital Theory, Returns to Education and On-the-job Learning: Evidence from Canadian Data," EcoMod2009 21500017, EcoMod.
    2. Yoram Weiss, 1976. "A Multiplicative Model of Investment in Human Capital," NBER Working Papers 0140, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Driffill, E John & Rosen, Harvey S, 1983. "Taxation and Excess Burden: A Life Cycle Perspective," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 24(3), pages 671-683, October.
    4. Edward Lazear, 1983. "Intergenerational Externalities," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 16(2), pages 212-228, May.
    5. James Heckman & Lance Lochner & Christopher Taber, 1998. "Explaining Rising Wage Inequality: Explanations With A Dynamic General Equilibrium Model of Labor Earnings With Heterogeneous Agents," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(1), pages 1-58, January.
    6. Syngjoo Choi & Shachar Kariv & Wieland M?ller & Dan Silverman, 2014. "Who Is (More) Rational?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(6), pages 1518-1550, June.
    7. Semih Tumen, 2015. "Skill Acquisition in the Informal Economy and Schooling Decisions: Evidence from Emerging Economies," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(3), pages 270-290, September.
    8. Krolikowski, Pawel, 2016. "Choosing a Control Group for Displaced Workers," Working Paper 1605, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 17 Aug 2017.
    9. Boyan Jovanovic, 1995. "Learning and Growth," NBER Working Papers 5383, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Dos Santos Marcelo Rodrigues, 2012. "Human Capital Formation and Criminal Behavior: The Role of Early Childhood Education," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-26, September.
    11. Huoying Wu, 2007. "Can The Human Capital Approach Explain Life-Cycle Wage Differentials Between Races And Sexes?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(1), pages 24-39, January.
    12. Weinberg, Bruce A., 2004. "Experience and Technology Adoption," IZA Discussion Papers 1051, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:84:y:1976:i:2:p:299-316. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division). General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.