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How Good Are Business School Rankings?

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  • Dichev, Ilia D

Abstract

Changes in Business Week and U.S. News graduate business school rankings have a strong tendency to revert. It seems that existing rankings are essentially simple aggregations of 'noisy' information and reversals of this noise are the most likely cause of reversibility in the rankings. Additionally, there is an almost puzzling lack of correlation between the contemporaneous changes of the two rankings, suggesting that most changes are not driven by common revisions of information. Thus, existing rankings should be probably viewed as useful but noisy and one-sided signals, rather than as comprehensive and efficient measures of the unobservable 'school quality.' Copyright 1999 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Dichev, Ilia D, 1999. "How Good Are Business School Rankings?," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 72(2), pages 201-213, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jnlbus:v:72:y:1999:i:2:p:201-13
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    Cited by:

    1. Gottesman, Aron A. & Morey, Matthew R., 2006. "Manager education and mutual fund performance," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 145-182, March.
    2. repec:eee:joaced:v:36:y:2016:i:c:p:16-42 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Grove, Wayne A. & Hussey, Andrew, 2014. "Returns to MBA quality: Pecuniary and non-pecuniary returns to peers, faculty, and institution quality," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 43-54.
    4. Bruno S. Frey & Margit Osterloh, 2006. "Evaluations: Hidden Costs, Questionable Benefits, and Superior Alternatives," IEW - Working Papers 302, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    5. Raj Aggarwal & Joanne Goodell & John Goodell, 2014. "Culture, Gender, and GMAT Scores: Implications for Corporate Ethics," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 125-143, August.
    6. Siemens, Jennifer Christie & Burton, Scot & Jensen, Thomas & Mendoza, Norma A., 2005. "An examination of the relationship between research productivity in prestigious business journals and popular press business school rankings," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(4), pages 467-476, April.
    7. Free, Clinton & Salterio, Steven E. & Shearer, Teri, 2009. "The construction of auditability: MBA rankings and assurance in practice," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 119-140, January.
    8. repec:pal:jorsoc:v:61:y:2010:i:4:d:10.1057_jors.2008.193 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:spr:scient:v:97:y:2013:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-013-0986-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Qi Kong & Michael R. Veall, 2005. "Does the Maclean's Ranking Matter?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 31(3), pages 231-242, September.

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