IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ucp/jnlbus/v68y1995i1p1-33.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

How Brokers Facilitate Trade for Long-Term Clients in Competitive Securities Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Aitken, Michael J
  • Garvey, Gerald T
  • Swan, Peter L

Abstract

In adverse-selection models of security market microstructure, a market maker could enhance efficiency if he or she were willing to sustain short-term trading losses. We show that this desirable activity can be supported as a self-enforcing agreement between broker-dealers and long-lived clients. An implication is that brokers who sustain such losses should charge higher fees to long-term clients for trades where the broker merely receives a commission. This prediction is supported by an analysis of brokerage rates on the Australian Stock Exchange. By contrast, market makers who make trading profits charge lower agency fees to large, long-term clients. Copyright 1995 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Aitken, Michael J & Garvey, Gerald T & Swan, Peter L, 1995. "How Brokers Facilitate Trade for Long-Term Clients in Competitive Securities Markets," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 68(1), pages 1-33, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jnlbus:v:68:y:1995:i:1:p:1-33
    DOI: 10.1086/296651
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/296651
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to JSTOR subscribers. See http://www.jstor.org for details.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Desgranges, Gabriel & Foucault, Thierry, 2005. "Reputation-based pricing and price improvements," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 57(6), pages 493-527.
    2. Michael Aitken & Niall Almeida & Frederick H. deB. Harris & Thomas H. McInish, 2008. "Financial analysts and price discovery," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 48(1), pages 1-24, March.
    3. Ainsworth, Andrew & Lee, Adrian D., 2014. "Waiting costs and limit order book liquidity: Evidence from the ex-dividend deadline in Australia," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 101-128.
    4. Aitken, Michael & Frino, Alex, 1996. "The accuracy of the tick test: Evidence from the Australian stock exchange," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(10), pages 1715-1729, December.
    5. Brown, Philip & Thomson, Nathanial & Walsh, David, 1999. "Characteristics of the order flow through an electronic open limit order book," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 335-357, November.
    6. Michail Anthropelos & Scott Robertson & Konstantinos Spiliopoulos, 2018. "Optimal Investment, Demand and Arbitrage under Price Impact," Papers 1804.09151, arXiv.org, revised Dec 2018.
    7. deB. Harris, Frederick H. & McInish, Thomas H. & Wood, Robert A., 2002. "Security price adjustment across exchanges: an investigation of common factor components for Dow stocks," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 277-308, July.
    8. W. Yang, 1999. "The Demand for and Supply of Shares. An Empirical Study of the Limit Order Book on the ASX," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 99-03, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    9. Aitken, Michael & Frino, Alex, 1996. "Execution costs associated with institutional trades on the Australian Stock Exchange," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 45-58, May.
    10. Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z., 1999. "Transaction costs and market institutions," MTID discussion papers 31, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Michael A. Goldstein & Paul Irvine & Eugene Kandel & Zvi Wiener, 2009. "Brokerage Commissions and Institutional Trading Patterns," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(12), pages 5175-5212, December.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:jnlbus:v:68:y:1995:i:1:p:1-33. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division). General contact details of provider: https://www.jstor.org/journal/jbusiness .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.