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Introduction to the Symposium on the Econometrics of Matching

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  • Robert A. Moffitt

    (Johns Hopkins University)

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  • Robert A. Moffitt, 2004. "Introduction to the Symposium on the Econometrics of Matching," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 1-3, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:86:y:2004:i:1:p:1-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles R. Hulten, 1978. "Growth Accounting with Intermediate Inputs," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 45(3), pages 511-518.
    2. Olley, G Steven & Pakes, Ariel, 1996. "The Dynamics of Productivity in the Telecommunications Equipment Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(6), pages 1263-1297, November.
    3. Jaimovich, Nir & Floetotto, Max, 2008. "Firm dynamics, markup variations, and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 1238-1252.
    4. James Levinsohn & Amil Petrin, 2003. "Estimating Production Functions Using Inputs to Control for Unobservables," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(2), pages 317-341.
    5. Ravazzolo, F. & van Dijk, H.K. & Verbeek, M.J.C.M., 2007. "Predictive gains from forecast combinations using time-varying model weights," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2007-26, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    6. Stock J.H. & Watson M.W., 2002. "Forecasting Using Principal Components From a Large Number of Predictors," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 97, pages 1167-1179, December.
    7. Gábor Kátay & Zoltán Wolf, 2008. "Driving Factors of Growth in Hungary - a Decomposition Exercise," MNB Working Papers 2008/6, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
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    Cited by:

    1. Bruce Fallick & Keunkwan Ryu, 2007. "The Recall and New Job Search of Laid-Off Workers: A Bivariate Proportional Hazard Model with Unobserved Heterogeneity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 313-323.
    2. Emiliano Magrini & Pierluigi Montalbano & Silvia Nenci & Luca Salvatici, 2014. "Agricultural Trade Policies and Food Security: Is there a Causal Relationship?," Working Papers 9/14, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.
    3. Marco Francesconi & Stephen P. Jenkins & Thomas Siedler, 2010. "The effect of lone motherhood on the smoking behavior of young adults," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(11), pages 1377-1384.
    4. Cher LI & Richard HARRIS, "undated". "Learning-by-Exporting? Firm-Level Evidence for UK Manufacturing and Services Sectors," EcoMod2008 23800080, EcoMod.
    5. Hutchinson, Paul & Carton, Thomas W. & Broussard, Marsha & Brown, Lisanne & Chrestman, Sarah, 2012. "Improving adolescent health through school-based health centers in post-Katrina New Orleans," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 360-368.
    6. Frölich, Markus & Michaelowa, Katharina, 2004. "Peer effects and textbooks in primary education : Evidence from francophone sub-Saharan Africa," HWWA Discussion Papers 311, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    7. Marco Francesconi & Stephen Jenkins & Thomas Siedler, 2010. "Childhood family structure and schooling outcomes: evidence for Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 1073-1103.
    8. Essama-Nssah, B., 2006. "Propensity score matching and policy impact analysis - a demonstration in EViews," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3877, The World Bank.
    9. Emiliano Magrini & Pierluigi Montalbano & Silvia Nenci & Luca Salvatici, 2017. "Agricultural (Dis)Incentives and Food Security: Is There a Link?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, pages 847-871.
    10. Jasjit Singh & Ajay Agrawal, 2011. "Recruiting for Ideas: How Firms Exploit the Prior Inventions of New Hires," Management Science, INFORMS, pages 129-150.
    11. Keith Brouhle & Brad Graham & Donna R Harrington, 2015. "Knowledge flows within a government supported program," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2326-2332.
    12. Baier, Scott L. & Bergstrand, Jeffrey H., 2009. "Estimating the effects of free trade agreements on international trade flows using matching econometrics," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 63-76.

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