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Locations, Outcomes, and Selective Migration

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  • Jacob L. Vigdor

    (Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University)

Abstract

Studies attempting to link locational attributes and individual outcomes often focus on children or young adults, under the presumption that their location was exogenously determined by their parents. This strategy is more difficult to justify if parents migrate selectively and tend to transmit their own characteristics to their children. This paper uses Census microdata to document a strong link between selective migration in one generation and economic outcomes in the next. I show that selective migration is a possible explanation for a puzzle in the existing literature: the changing relationship between segregation levels and individual outcomes within the black population. © 2002 President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Jacob L. Vigdor, 2002. "Locations, Outcomes, and Selective Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(4), pages 751-755, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:84:y:2002:i:4:p:751-755
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Steven Stern & Elizabeth Merwin & Emily Hauenstein & Ivora Hinton & Virgina Rovnyak & Melvin Wilson & Ishan Williams & Irma Mahone, 2008. "The E¤ect of Rurality on Mental and Physical Health," Virginia Economics Online Papers 381, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
    2. Christian Bayer & Falko Juessen, 2012. "On the Dynamics of Interstate Migration: Migration Costs and Self-Selection," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 377-401, July.
    3. Collins, William J. & Margo, Robert A., 2003. "Race and the value of owner-occupied housing, 1940-1990," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 255-286, May.
    4. Stephen L. Ross, 2009. "Social Interactions within Cities: Neighborhood Environments and Peer Relationships," Working papers 2009-31, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    5. Vigdor, Jacob L., 2003. "Residential segregation and preference misalignment," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 587-609, November.
    6. Robert Bifulco & Delia Furtado & Stephen L. Ross, 2009. "Why Are Ghettos Bad? Examining the Role of the Metropolitan Educational Environment," Working papers 2009-30, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

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