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Technological Change And Productivity Growth In Italian Regions, 1982-2001

  • Francesco QUATRARO


    (Columbia University)

This paper first brings together aggregate data from the 20 Italian regions, concerning the dynamics of Total Factor Productivity (TFP) over twenty years, and then investigates the relationship between the observed variance in TFP evolution and the level of knowledge capital, both private and public, human capital and patent applications. Over the last decade a growing debate emerged in Italy concerning the transition of the national economy toward specialization in service sectors, despite the continuing relevance of manufacturing activities. The transition is supposed to be managed in different ways, according to the different governance mechanisms at work in different contexts. The opposition between a "first capitalistic organization" and a "second" one provides a useful framework to the interpretation of the dynamics in progress. The results stemming from econometric tests confirm the existence of different patterns of evolution, driven by different sets of factors, according to the specific way the economic activities are organized in each of the twenty Italian regions.

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Article provided by Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var in its journal Région et Développement.

Volume (Year): 24 (2006)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 135-158

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Handle: RePEc:tou:journl:v:24:y:2006:p:135-158
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  1. Rosenberg, Nathan, 1974. "Science, Invention and Economic Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 84(333), pages 90-108, March.
  2. Schmookler, Jacob, 1962. "Economic Sources of Inventive Activity," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(01), pages 1-20, March.
  3. C. Antonelli, 2007. "Localized Technological Change," Chapters, in: Elgar Companion to Neo-Schumpeterian Economics, chapter 16 Edward Elgar.
  4. Zvi Griliches, 1995. "The Discovery of the Residual: An Historical Note," NBER Working Papers 5348, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Young, Allyn A., 1928. "Increasing Returns and Economic Progress," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 38, pages 527-542.
  6. Richard R. Nelson, 1959. "The Economics of Invention: A Survey of the Literature," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32, pages 101.
  7. Mokyr, Joel, 1990. "Punctuated Equilibria and Technological Progress," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 350-54, May.
  8. Zvi Griliches, 1995. "The Discovery of the Residual: A Historic Note," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1742, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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