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Keynes's Analysis of Economic Crises and Monetary Policy in the General Theory : Its Relevance after 75 Years


  • Peter Docherty


This paper argues that Keynes's treatment of economic fluctuations and monetary policy in the General Theory is still relevant after 75 years. His treatment of severe economic crises provides considerable insight into the possibility of crises emanating from financial markets, and for understanding how financial disturbances may have real economic effects. Keynes's insights into the potential limitations of using monetary policy to deal with periods of crisis and how these limitations may be addressed are also shown to be relevant to the recent global financial crisis. The paper also argues that the General Theory has insights to offer on the use of Taylor rules and on the possibility of addressing persistent unemployment.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Docherty, 2011. "Keynes's Analysis of Economic Crises and Monetary Policy in the General Theory : Its Relevance after 75 Years," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 521-535, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:revpoe:v:23:y:2011:i:4:p:521-535 DOI: 10.1080/09538259.2011.611617

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Allgoewer, Elisabeth, 2003. "Emil Lederer: Business Cycles, Crises, and Growth," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(03), pages 327-348, September.
    2. Darity, William A, Jr & Horn, Bobbie L, 1985. "Rudolf Hilferding: The Dominion of Capitalism and the Dominion of Gold," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 363-368, May.
    3. Michaelides, Panayotis G. & Milios, John G., 2005. "The Influence of the German Historical School on Schumpeter," MPRA Paper 74471, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Screpanti, Ernesto & Zamagni, Stefano, 2005. "An Outline of the History of Economic Thought," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 2, number 9780199279142, June.
    5. Daniele Besomi, 2006. "'Marxism Gone Mad': Tugan-Baranovsky on crises, their possibility and their periodicity," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 147-171.
    6. Colacchio, Giorgio, 2005. "On the origins of non-proportional economic dynamics: A note on Tugan-Baranowsky's traverse analysis," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 503-521, December.
    7. Gottfried Haberler, 1950. "Joseph Alois Schumpeter 1883–1950," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(3), pages 333-372.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giancarlo Bertocco & Andrea Kalajzic, 2014. "The liquidity preference theory: a critical analysis," Economics and Quantitative Methods qf1402, Department of Economics, University of Insubria.
    2. Kosta Josifidis & Alpar LosÌŒonc, 2014. "Some Thoughts on Power: International Context," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 61(5), pages 597-615, October.
    3. Peter Docherty, 2012. "Keynes’s General Theory, the Quantity Theory of Money and Monetary Policy," Chapters,in: Keynes’s General Theory, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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